An online “snapshot” of key home performance industry programs, allies and resources for prospective program sponsors!

Learn how program sponsors in 20+ states are beginning to transform the home improvement marketplace beyond free “clipboard” home energy audits and single-measure rebates with a whole-house approach to energy efficiency, demand response, renewable energy, and “carbon footprint” issues.

This compendium is designed for program designers with energy utilities, state energy offices and regional alliances looking for comprehensive, integrated market transformation program platform for the improvement of existing homes in their community.

Industry Compendium 2008

Introduction  

Home Performance with energy star® Program Overview

National Sponsors

 

U. S. Department of Energy

U. S. Environmental Protection Agency

 

Leading Program Partner Profiles  

Arizona:   Foundation for Senior Living

California:  Anaheim Public Utilities; California Building Performance Contractors Association (CBPCA)

Colorado:  E-Star Colorado

Florida:  Gainesville

Georgia:  Georgia Power, Jackson EMC

Idaho:  Idaho Energy Star

Illinois:  TRICON

Maine:  Efficiency Maine

Massachusetts:  National Grid

Minnesota:  Xcel Energy

Missouri:  Department of Natural Resources Missouri Home Performance with Energy Star; Gateway Center for Resource Efficiency; Metropolitan Energy Center, Kansas City

New Jersey:  New Jersey Bureau of Public Utilities

New York:  Long Island Power Authority; New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

Ohio:  First Energy

Oregon:  Oregon Trust

Pennsylvania:   West Penn Energy Sustainable Fund

Rhode Island: - See Massachusetts, National Grid (RI)

Texas:  Austin Energy

Vermont:  Efficiency Vermont

Wisconsin:  Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation

Wyoming:  Wyoming Home Performance

 

Industry Ally Profiles

Building Performance Institute, Inc.

Conservation Services Group

Edison Electric Institute

Energy Finance Solutions

Electric & Gas Industries Association

GreenHomes America

Hudson Valley Community College

ICF International

Lockheed Martin Business Process Solutions

Market Development Group

Performance Systems Development

 

Bibliography

2007  Austin Energy Home Performance with Energy Star Report  

2005  Greening of a Home Performance Contractor

August 2004  Charting the Territory

November 2003  PIER Contractor Study

August 2003  Welcome to the Machine

April 2003   Keeping Score

December 2000  Pacific Gas & Electric Company Report

July 2000    CEC Whole House Contractor Credentialing

March 2000   Building Your Business

September 1999   Home Energy Ratings Sweep the Nation, Almost

November 1997  Working the Utility/Contractor Connection

December 1995   Conference Christens Home Performance Industry

March 1994   Residential Energy Services Market Transformation

ACEEE relevant papers/presentations

 

Event Proceedings   

California Utility Collaboration to Transform Existing Homes with Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Workshop, Downey, CA March 2008

Beyond Home Energy Audits with Home Performance with energy staR Workshop, Long Island, NY September 2007   (click here for printable 2007 Proceedings)
 


Introduction

Energy efficiency offers one of the lowest cost solutions for improving our energy security, reducing our energy bills, and addressing the important issue of global climate change—all while helping to grow the economy. Energy efficiency is increasingly important to families and businesses, particularly now with the higher fuel prices of the past several years.   
 

Energy efficiency is especially important among homeowners. The average homeowner spends $1,900 annually on energy. The average energy cost in US homes is 45 kBtu/SqFt/Yr but some homes use twice that amount. This is because more than half of all  single-family homes in the US were built before modern energy codes.  [1] Many of these homes have no wall insulation, high levels of air infiltration, poor duct systems, and inefficient heating and AC systems. In fact, 60 percent of US households report having winter drafts  [2] and 62 percent complain of a room that is too warm in the summer. [3]


[1]  The Changing Structure of the Home Remodeling Industry, Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies
[2]  2004 American Home Comfort Survey Decision Analyst
[3]  2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

To help US homeowners increase the energy efficiency of their homes, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) developed the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) Program. This program offers a comprehensive, whole-house approach to improving energy efficiency and comfort at home, while helping to protect the environment.

This program takes a “whole house approach” that begins with a comprehensive energy audit by a trained and certified contractor. This whole-house assessment includes diagnostic tests, by a qualified contractor who can make comprehensive improvements or refer home owners who can make these improvements.

A Home Performance with ENERGY STAR sponsor is responsible for overseeing the program's implementation and the performance of participating contractors to ensure that quality standards are met. To be effective in this role a sponsor must be legally and financially independent from participating contractors. Sponsoring a program is a significant commitment and will require an investment of financial resources and staff. Therefore, organizations should establish a budget and identify a consistent source of revenue before making a commitment.  Organizations such as a utility, state energy agency, municipality or non-profit energy efficiency organization are typical program administrators who understand local market conditions, can provide third-party oversight to home improvement contractors, work to protect the ENERGY STAR mark, and generally serve the public interest.

A program sponsor (or administrator) is responsible for:

1.  Developing the program standards, policies and procedures

2.  Managing the program

3.  Recruiting contractor participation

4.  Promoting the program and

5.  Ensuring that work completed under the program meets program standards including energy savings (i.e.,quality assurance). 

6.  Evaluating program success

Another important component of this program is that the contractor must “test in” and “test out” which means that all completed projects are verified upon completion to ensure that the improvements were installed properly and the homeowner will achieve the energy savings. The Test-out is an important step at the end to verify that improvements to the home will be effective 

This program is gaining traction across the US. Currently there are more than a dozen active programs, and many more are being established across the country.

 National HPwES  Map

Energy Savings Potential

Estimated energy saving for the typical home that receives Home Performance with ENERGY STAR will very based on the region of the country and type improvements completed.  The first HPwES programs included:  Austin Energy, Wisconsin Focus on Energy, and the New York Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA).  These pioneering programs have collectively improved the efficiency of nearly 20,000 existing homes saving their customers an estimated $400 per year in energy costs. 
 

The following table gives a baseline for energy savings potential by region of the country.  Results from existing programs have demonstrated higher savings. 
 

Table 1 – Potential Per Home Energy Savings

Census Region

Northeast

Midwest

South

West

Electricity (kWh)

780

1100

4000

830

Natural Gas (Therms)

390

410

200

200

Lessons Learned

The US DOE and EPA have also learned some valuable lessons from the current program sponsors based on their experiences. These lessons are summarized next. 
 

Lesson 1: Contractor Participation Is Key

·         A participation agreement is your contract with the contractor

·         Be clear about what you will do and what they will do

·         Participating contractors should complete at least 25 jobs per year to remain eligible for incentives

·         Keep contractor requirements simple, but include things like eligibility criteria, conditions, standards, goals, reporting, quality assurance and logo use

·         Make it a clear and easy process for reporting

·         Make program benefits contingent on reaching goals

#    Benefits may include training, use of logo, incentives, recognition, etc.

#   Training is too valuable to give away

#   Track web and phone leads

·         Don’t list contractors on web site

Lesson 2: Contractors Need to “Own” It

·         Recruitment of “right” contractors requires time and resources… the “wrong” contractors are easy to find, and will not lead to program success.

·         Contractors will face new demands – the owner needs to be company champion and change agent. Otherwise, the contractors will slip back to old “business as usual.”

·         Contractors must actively market new services – not rely on program to generate all leads

Lesson 3: Financing Helps Sales

·         Ease of access is critical

·         Simple, quick, and hassle free

·         Low rates are not the most important feature

·         Access to multiple financing options is a big plus

·         Need ways to reach hard-to-qualify homeowners

·         Financing and or incentives can play key role in getting contractors to submit completed jobs!

Lesson 4: Sponsorship is Engaging

·         Successful programs have very active sponsors

·         Take leadership in marketing

·         Protect the ENERGY STAR Logo

·         Connects with broader industry- utilities, builders, state energy offices, etc

·         Becomes the local energy efficiency champion

·         Recognizes successful contractors – sponsors training events

·         Participates as a national efficiency stakeholder

·         Applies for ENERGY STAR National Awards

Steps to Develop a HpwES Program
EPA and DOE also recommend that program sponsors should complete the following steps.

Step 1: Conduct Market Research
Typical activities from successful program sponsors include the following actions:

·         Establish an advisory board

·         Conduct a market assessment

·         Select a pilot market to launch program

·         Select a program design

#         A bona fide whole-house approach

#         Basic design encourages consultant or contractor model

#         Need an effective strategy to turn audit recommendations into completed home improvements

·        Need an effective strategy to monitor the quality of the work performed under the program

·        Start developing a marketing plan

Step 2: Develop Policies and Procedures
Typical activities from successful program sponsors include the following actions:

·        Strategy to recruit contractors to participate

·        Training, incentives, financing, or equipment

·        Leads

·        Contractor participation agreement

·        Eligibility criteria, conditions, standards, expectations/goals, reporting, and logo use

·        Contractor reporting and quality assurance procedures

·        Checklists, software, reviews and inspections

·        Procedures to use financing or other incentives

·        Keep it simple

STEP 3: Partner with ENERGY STAR
Typical activities from successful program sponsors include the following actions:

·        Summarize your program in an implementation plan

·        Sign partnership agreement

·        Use ENERGY STAR resources

#         Marketing toolkit

#         Consumer brochure

#         Contractor sales training

#         Contractor business development guide

#         Successful contractor profiles

To learn more about the HPwES Program, contact
Patricia Plympton, Navigant Consulting supporting U.S. DOE202-481-7397
1801 K Street, NW Suite 500, Washington, DC  20006-1301    Patricia.plympton@navigantconsulting.com

Chandler von Schrader, EPA, 202 343-9096
1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW   S EPA (6202J), Washington, DC  20460  Vonschrader.chandler@epa.gov

Dale Hoffmeyer, EPA, 202 343-9013
1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC  20460   Hoffmeyer.dale@epa.gov

 


Home Performance with Energy Star® Program Overview

National Sponsor Information

U.S. Department of Energy

Mailing Address:1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585

Telephone:   1-800-dial-DOE

Web site:  www.doe.gov; www.eere.energy.gov/; www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/

The Department of Energy (DOE)'s overarching mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The Department's strategic goals to achieve the mission are designed to deliver results along five strategic themes:

·         Energy Security:  Promoting America’s energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy

·         Nuclear Security:  Ensuring America’s nuclear security

·         Scientific Discovery and Innovation:  Strengthening U.S. scientific discovery, economic competitiveness, and improving quality of life through innovations in science and technology

·         Environmental Responsibility:  Protecting the environment by providing a responsible resolution to the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production

·         Management Excellence:  Enabling the mission through sound management

·         The Building Technologies Program:

DOE's Building Technologies Program (BTP) works in partnership with states, industry, and manufacturers to improve the energy efficiency of our nation's buildings. 

BTP:

·         Advances the research and development of energy-efficient building technologies and practices for both new and existing residential and commercial buildings

·         Works with state and local regulatory groups and others to improve building codes, appliance and equipment standards, and guidelines for efficient energy use

·         Promotes market transformation by educating homeowners, builders, and developers about the significant returns they can achieve by adopting energy-efficient technologies and practices

Energy-efficient buildings are better buildings. They use less energy, cost less to operate, and improve comfort. They help the environment and our nation, improving our energy security as well as the everyday lives of Americans.

ENERGY STAR®

ENERGY STAR® is a government-backed program helping businesses and individuals protect the environment through superior energy efficiency.

Results are already adding up. Last year alone, Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR® , saved enough energy to power 10 million homes and avoid greenhouse gas emissions from 12 million cars - all while saving $6 billion.

For these reasons, the Department of Energy is a proud supporter of the Energy Star program.  In addition, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provides information about energy efficient appliances and building.

The DOE develops technical requirements and qualifications defining ENERGY STAR status, and work with manufacturers, retailers, and utilities to promote the manufacture and use of ENERGY STAR products.

For more information contact:

Patricia Plympton, Navigant Consulting supporting U.S. DOE
1801 K Street, NW Suite 500, Washington, DC  20006-1301
202-481-7397,
Patricia.plympton@navigantconsulting.com


National Sponsor Information

U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 

Mailing Address:  1200 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20460 

Web site:   www.energystar.gov

ENERGY STAR® is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy helping us all save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices. Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR, saved enough energy in 2006 alone to avoid greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from 25 million cars — all while saving $14 billion on their utility bills.

The ENERGY STAR® program has been a tremendous success in its first decade. Established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1992 for energy-efficient computers, the ENERGY STAR program has grown to encompass more than 35 product categories for the home and workplace, new homes, and superior energy management within organizations. Some highlights demonstrating the impact of this program are: Thousands of organizations have partnered with the federal government to demonstrate a commitment to protecting the environment through energy efficiency. Americans have purchased more than 1 billion ENERGY STAR qualified products. More than 100,000 families live in new homes that have earned the ENERGY STAR. More than 40 percent of the American public recognizes the ENERGY STAR.  

The ENERGY STAR program has dramatically increased the use of energy-efficient products and practices and is well positioned to promote more widespread efficiency improvements.  

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, launched in 2001, is a whole house improvement program that emphasizes a home diagnostic evaluation and improvements made by a trained technician, coupled with a strong quality assurance program administered by a regional sponsor. This comprehensive whole-house approach, backed by EPA and DOE, increases the comfort of existing homes, saves homeowners money on utility bills, and reduces peak loads.  State and locally sponsored Home Performance with ENERGY STAR programs have improved more than 26,000 homes across the country since 2001.                          

ENERGY STAR is designed to overcome many of the market barriers to the adoption of cost-effective energy efficiency products and services in a sustained manner and to help unleash the attendant savings for individuals and organizations. EPA’s funding is not used to buy equipment, products, or services as is the case with some energy efficiency programs, such as traditional demand-side management (DSM) programs seeking near-term energy savings. Funding is used to provide businesses and consumers with information and tools that break down major market barriers and alter decision making for the long term.  

This approach, which helps direct private capital toward energy efficiency investments, provides a large environmental and economic payback for the government’s investment. ENERGY STAR enhances the market for energy efficiency by reducing the transaction costs and lowering the investment risks to the point that more projects become attractive. 

For more information contact:

Chandler von Schrader, U.S. EPA
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20460
202-343-9096, vonschrader.chandler@epa.gov 

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Leading Program Partner Profiles

Arizona:

Partner Information

Company Name:  FSL Home Improvements (AZ)

Mailing Address:  1201 East Thomas Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85014

Telephone:   602 285-1800

Web site:  www.fsl.org

 

History with HPwES

For more than 30 years, the Foundation for Senior Living has worked to improve the quality of life for seniors, adults with disability and their family caregivers. The Foundation for Senior Living is one of the largest non-profit organizations in Arizona. It operates Arizona’s HPwES on behalf of Arizona Public Service (APS).  

The Home Improvement program of the Foundation for Senior Living also operates the Arizona Building Science & Energy Efficiency Training Facility. The facility is sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Arizona Department of Commerce-Energy Office, Southwest Gas, and APS along with a one-time contribution from SRP.

The FSL Training Facility provides weatherization, energy efficiency and building science training for building contractors, weatherization auditors and repair technicians located throughout the southwestern United States. Participants receive classroom and hands-on experience in a laboratory specifically designed to teach pressure diagnostics and combustion safety techniques. In 2006, FSL has begun partnering with the Building Performance Institute to begin certifying Energy Analysts and Building Shell Technicians.

Year Program Began:  July 2007

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  No information provided

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Low income seniors, families, and disabled home owners.

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

All contractors sign participation agreement, and there is a 100% review by staff of all paperwork and 15% of all jobs are reviewed by FSL staff.

The program, which is just starting, already has 6 BPI certified technicians more than 12 have the required diagnostic equipment. The program has developed a strong contractor outreach component.  

The Home Improvements Program offers a wide range of services, including emergency
and minor home repairs, medical modifications and major renovations.

Minor Repair Services:

* Finish Carpentry

* Heating and Cooling Repairs

* Plumbing Repairs

* Lighting

* Installation of Home Safety and Assistive Devices

Major Housing Rehabilitation and Accessibility Conversions:

* Plumbing, HVAC and Electrical Projects

* Door Widening

* Bathroom Renovations

* Wheelchair Ramps

* Roof Repairs or Replacement

All major housing rehabilitation must be applied for through local city government. Due to demand and limited funding, there may be a waiting list for services.

Measuring Results:  No information provided

Project Goal:  No information provided.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:  No information provided.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

Training is provided by the Southwest Building Science Center

Contractors are certified through BPI.  All contractors must have at least one BPI certified auditor.

Summit Blue Consulting working as Measurement and Verification inspector for APS.

Reasons for Success/Failure: Too soon to tell

Lessons Learned: Not applicable

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.fsl.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Carrie Smith, Phone: 602 285-1800,
Email: csmith@fls.org

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California:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:  Anaheim Public Utilities

Mailing Address:   201 S Anaheim Blvd.  Suite 801, Anaheim, CA 92805     

Telephone:   714-765-4267

Web site:  www.anaheim.net

 

History with HPwES

Anaheim Public Utilities (APU) is a publicly-owned, not-for-profit electric and water utility that is responsible for delivering high quality, economical electric and water utility services to residents and businesses in the City of Anaheim.

Anaheim Public Utilities markets its version of the HPwES through its Home Investment Package (HIP). The Home Investment Package begins with a whole-home audit that reviews all key areas, from lighting and appliances to ventilation, heating, cooling and insulation. A  Building Performance Institute (BPI) certified contractor works with customers to implement home energy improvements. Participating customers also qualify for low-interest financing and rebates to help defray the cost of energy improvements.  

The first year’s budget was $600,000.

Year Program began:  May 2007

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

  • Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

  • Address comfort problems

  • Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

  • Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

  • Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

  • Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

  • Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions

  • Improve the durability and performance of older housing stock

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets: High electric customers through direct mail marketing.

Delivery Methodology: Services are delivered through APU’s list of certified contractors. As a way to encourage contractor recruitment, APU reimburses 50 percent of the training costs to contractors after they complete 5 HIP projects.

Measuring Results

How do you measure program results? 

  •  Energy savings

  •  Number of jobs completed

  •  Number of contractors trained

  •  Value of the home improvements

Project Goal:  APU wants to complete up to 300 projects in 2008.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

The program is administered by Conservation Services Group (CSG). Additional financing is provided through the Electric and Gas Industries Association (EGIA). The contractor training classes are provided by the California Building Performance Contractors Association (CBPCA).

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Phil Hayes: Residential Programs Manager, phayes@ahaheim.net; 714 765-4267 

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Partner Information

 

Company Name:  California Building Performance Contractors Association (CBPCA)

Mailing Address:   1000 Broadway, Suite 410, Oakland, CA 94607           

Telephone:   888.357.1777

Web site:  www.cbpca.org


History with HPwES

The California Building Performance Contractors Association (CBPCA) was formed in 2001 to transform the residential retrofit market through home performance contracting and lead it toward fulfilling the goals of greater energy efficiency and improved health, safety, comfort, and durability. CBPCA is also a California accredited HERS Provider, with an emphasis on existing homes.

CBPCA operates two separate home performance programs in California in addition to its major subcontractor role in the Anaheim program.

Northern California: CBPCA operated a $3.5 million introductory Home Performance with Energy Star program for Pacific Gas & Electric in 2002-06, and continues to provide training for more home performance contractor personnel through Pacific Gas &Electric (PG&E)’s Energy Training Center. CBPCA also serves as a trade association for the contractors trained in both of those PG&E programs, providing marketing leads, materials, advisory services and access to the HPwES program.

Southern California: CBPCA is providing a similar introductory Home Performance with Energy Star program for Southern California Edison (SCE) in 2007-08. This program is based on lessons learned in the Northern California program and offers optional BPI certification. The contractor recruitment, training, and mentoring are done by CBPCA in collaboration with the Anaheim HPwES program since CBPCA is also responsible for those aspects of the Anaheim program under subcontract from Conservation Services Group. The Edison budget is $1.25 million for the two-year term.
 

Year Program Began:  2002 in Northern California, 2006 in Southern California

 

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

  • Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

  • Address comfort problems

  • Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

  • Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

  • Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

  • Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

  • Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Other: Demonstrate the value of the broad range of non-energy benefits (health, safety, home value, reduced repair, environmentalism, etc.) in gaining homeowner investment in major energy and peak demand savings.

Program Implementation Strategy

 

The CBPCA’s approach has been to provide extensive free training and field mentoring to contractors in both technical and business/marketing/sales aspects of home performance work, in recognition of the full range of difficulties contractors often face in adapting to this work. CBPCA seeks to make home performance contracting successful through emphasis on the full range of energy and non-energy benefits rather than consumer subsidies. To date no homeowner incentives have been offered, relying instead on supporting contractor marketing, sales, and reporting. Different business models are encouraged, ranging from all-inclusive home assessment and repair to separation of the home assessment step and use of a variety of specialty contractors for the repair work.

 

Target Markets:  Single-family (attached/detached) home owners in the PG&E and SCE territories in CA, with future expansion to the remainder of the state.

 

Delivery Methodology: 


Contractors and related specialists such as energy raters and home inspectors are trained to find effective HPwES business models and collaborate as needed. Home assessments are generally marketed by CBPCA-trained remodelers or specialty contractors who will also do the recommended home repairs. Most marketing is done by the contractors.  Market-rate financing is offered by contractors through the Electric and Gas Industries Association (EGIA).

Contractors in CBPCA’s current Northern and Southern California programs receive free training in building science, home assessment, repair practices, and business, marketing, and sales training. The Southern California program also provides free field mentoring, consulting, and marketing, as did the original PG&E 2002-06 program, plus a $100 incentive payment for contractor job data reporting. To date, over 300 contractor personnel have been trained in Northern California and approximately 120 in the still-new Southern California program.

Measuring Results
 

Program results are tracked in the following ways:

  • Number of personnel trained and contractors included

  • Value of the home improvements

  • Other: Demonstration of the value of the full range of non-energy benefits in securing homeowner investment in comprehensive energy retrofits with maximum energy and peak demand savings.

Project Goal:  

 

Southern California Edison seeks a total of 150 contractor personnel trained and a variety of mentoring, marketing, and verification activities completed within two years. The earlier PG&E program had similar goals, which were achieved or exceeded; the current training program for PG&E is planned to graduate approximately 150 persons over 18 months and is on schedule to meet that target. Since these have been technically outreach programs rather than part of the utilities’ energy saving portfolios, there were no formal requirements for specific levels of energy savings.

 

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: At a projected $15,000 average homeowner investment, the total for each 1000 homes would approximate $15 million. The number of home retrofits completed in Northern California is unknown due to earlier reporting obstacles but is estimated to be in the 2000 range, implying a gross homeowner investment level of some $30 million to date.  The current annual rate for all the California programs is estimated at 1000 retrofits and accelerating.

 

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies
 

CBPCA employs a variety of consultants and staff. Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. (BKi) manages home performance activities and business-related training for the Association, Chitwood Energy Services conducts technical training, Chitwood and Maximum Performance Housing conduct field mentoring, Saturn Resource Management and Performance Systems Development both assisted in curriculum development and refinement, and the Electric and Gas Industries Association (EGIA) provides financing services. CBPCA is also allied with Conservation Services Group in the Anaheim HPwES program, in which the training and other field activities are CBPCA responsibilities and conducted in close coordination with CBPCA’s Southern California Edison program.

 

Reasons for Success/Failure

 

Program Success
 

The Northern California HPwES efforts have succeeded in training a large number of contractor personnel—approximately 300 to date—due to very aggressive recruitment and extensive training support.  For the same reason, the new Southern California program is training at an even faster rate despite more extensive training requirements.  We also anticipate success of this program’s innovative marketing efforts, including the recently approved use of the utility’s billing data to identify and solicit “gross polluter” homeowner participation and also intensive involvement with realtors and building inspectors as a way to build an early market and reassure contractors of viability.

 

Program Failure

 

These programs are successful in meeting their key goals. But as in all home performance programs, the degree of learning and business reorientation required has been a major obstacle to effective contractor participation, causing many dropouts and serious consideration of more gradual staged training regimes and improved multi-contractor business models in future CBPCA programs. In addition, the early Northern California program’s lack of incentives to induce contractor job data reporting caused difficulty in proving market penetration and energy savings for the utility. Future program adjustments are planned to add homeowner incentives tied to contractor data submittal acceptability.

 

Lessons Learned

  • Home performance contracting cannot “compete” successfully for funding versus other simpler energy efficiency programs unless factors such as non-energy benefits (which appear to be the dominant reason for homeowner participation) and long-term job volume growth (due to contractors continuing to add new jobs) are included in benefit/cost assessments. Metrics reform is needed.

  • Seek ways to simplify or multi-stage the contractor training and diagnostic requirements to broaden participation and avoid demoralization and dropouts

  • Seek to minimize contractor overhead activity and cost requirements in every possible way, from marketing to job data recording and reporting to energy savings estimation

  • Put heavy emphasis on assistance in business planning and practices, marketing, and sales rather than only technical building science and methods

  • Invest in contractor applicant orientation and screening to reduce wasted training effort on non-serious or incapable contractors

  • Financial incentives to contractors may not be sufficient to gain adequate job data reporting; homeowner incentives now seem necessary

  • Avoid the complexity of conventional measure-based consumer incentives in favor of a combination of low-interest financing and cash-back options (and make those contingent on contractor job data reporting).

  • Make use of utility sponsor access to customer data and effective targeted utility marketing media such as bill stuffers, letters to high-bill users, websites, and public awareness campaigns

  • Seek industry-wide liability insurance coverage specific to home performance contracting; the RESNET group insurance will cover the diagnosis if done by a qualified rater, whether a contractor employee or independent consultant

  • Verify effort vs. accuracy of energy savings estimation options, and tailor data requirements and analytic responsibilities to contractor capabilities; consider simple bill-disaggregation methods in addition to simulation models

Best Way to Learn of New Developments

Contact Harry Ford, BKi’s home performance program manager for CBPCA at hford@bki.com or 510.444.8707 x206.  Also check the www.cbpca.org website.

 

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact

 

 CBPCA: Dr. Robert Knight, Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc., Oakland, CA; rknight@bki.com

 Southern California Edison: Davi Ibarra, program manager, davi.ibarra@sce.com

 Pacific Gas & Electric: Charles Segerstrom, Director, Energy Training Center-Stockton, CFS1@pge.com

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Colorado:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:  E-Star Colorado

Mailing Address:  820 S. Monaco Pkwy, #295 , Denver, CO, 80224

Telephone:   631-755-5313

Web site:  www.coloradohomeperformance.org; www.e-star.com


History with HPwES
 

E Star Colorado is an independent 501(c)3 nonprofit that has been the provider of HPwES program in Colorado since 2003 or 2004.  E-Star received funding from EPA, Colorado Springs Utility, Fort Collins Utility and the City of Boulder to get the program off the ground.  During the 2004-2006 time frame E-Star received about $300,000. The program focused on training contractors.  As of the end of 2006 five contractors were qualified and completing projects.

In late 2006 E-Star’s management changed – the Executive Director of the Colorado Energy Science Center (CESC) became E-Star’s Acting Executive Director.  By early 2007 more funding was attracted to the program from Boulder, Fort Collins Utility and Johns Manville Insulation. 

The program has focused on providing contractor training and support.  Now that E-Star and CESC are working closer together, CESC is beginning to provide more information on home performance through its  SmartEnergyLiving Program (www.smartenergyliving.org).  The newest issue of the Smart Energy Living magazine includes an article on HPwES.                                 

Year Program Began:  2003

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

  • Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

  • Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

  • Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

  • Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.  

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Single family home owners in Colorado

Delivery Methodology  

Contractor driven program to date, but the CESC is exploring using other delivery options as well including CO Home Energy Raters (HERS). Saturn Resources developed a training curriculum and the next training period is scheduled to start in the Fall of 2007. 

Currently, there are five active contractors and the goal is to include the number of trained contractors to at least 15.  These contractors will also be encouraged to receive BPI certification. Currently contractors pay for training and equipment. There are also funds set aside to perform quality assurance by staff.

Past marketing efforts have been sponsored through the EPA. The website has also been redesigned.

Measuring Results

How do you measure program results? 

  • Energy savings

  •  Number of jobs completed

  •  Number of contractors trained

  • Value of the home improvements

Project Goal:  Approximately 10 jobs were completed in 2005; 26 in 2006, and 75 are forecast in 2007.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:  Not Available

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

The program has received support from four organizations: Colorado Springs Utilities, Fort Collins Utility, the City of Boulder and the Colorado Governor’s Energy Office.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

  • They have established a strong training program.

  • They have attracted funding from key Colorado funders.

Program Failure

  • HP contractors are able to use some utility incentives in Fort Collins and Colorado Springs, but there is not a distinct incentive for HPwES.  

  • The program has good support from several in-state funders but none at a level large enough to support an aggressive program. 

  • The current job volume is low, and  contractors have not reported consistently.    

Lessons Learned

Much has been learned about what it takes for a contractor to succeed.

E-Star is being more aggressive on this new round of contractor recruitment after seeing how much attrition there is to a group of contractor recruits before they can be successful attracting customers and completing projects.  This approach seems to be working – the new round of training that begins in late September is far larger than the previous two rounds and has a strong group of contractors.

More effort must be invested into getting contractors to report.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.e-star.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Pat Keegan, Acting Executive Director, pkeegan@energyscience.org
 

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Florida:

Partner Information

Company Name: Gainesville Regional Utilities- Coming Soon! 

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Georgia:

Partner Information

Company Name: Georgia Power Company (coming soon)

Company Name: Jackson EMC (coming soon) 

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Idaho:
Partner Information


Company Name: 
Idaho Energy Division

Mailing Address: PO Box 83720, Boise, ID 83720-0098

Web site: www.idahoenergystar.com

 

History with HPwES

Year Program Began:   September 2005

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  Not provided

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Residential home owners

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

·         The major focus is reaching out to home improvement contractors and remodelers.

·         IED offered a free training course for contractors and also offered and to date, 29 contractors have completed training.

·         Training was offered free - ID Falls Co-op now offering $125 to offset Home Assessment costs

·         Idaho Falls Cooperative offers customers a rebate of $125 to defray the costs of the energy audits, referred to as Home Assessments.

·         Other marketing activities include using EPA materials and web page support. Idaho Power is providing print brochures for mailing and outreach at home shows.

Measuring Results:  Not provided.

Project Goal: 12 jobs in 2006; 75 forecasted for 2007.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:  Not Available.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

The Idaho Energy Division (IED) works with the following partners to implement this program: Idaho Power Company, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA), Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI) and Conservation Services Group (CSG).

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success:  Minor utility incentives - low rate financing is key

Program Failure:  Small contractor base to date.

Lessons Learned:  Not available

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.homeperformance.idaho.gov

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Idaho Energy Division ; 1-800-334-SAVE(7283); energyspecialist@idwr.idaho.gov

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Illinois:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:  Tricon

Mailing Address:   124 SW Adams St. Suite 315, Peoria, IL 61602

Telephone:   309 637-0934

Web site:  www.better-built.us

For information on Illinois- Metro East Activities see Missouri Home Performance Profile

 

History with HPwES

This program is operated by the Tri-County Construction Labor Management Council (TRICON). Operated under the name “Better Built,” this trade association promotes building science education and training to home performance contractors. The organization received $200,000 funding form the State of Illinois through 2008. The program also receives funding from the local utility, Ameren.

The program is viewed as a way to mitigate upcoming rate increases in both electricity and natural gas. 

Year Program Began:  May 2007

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  Not provided 

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Home owners in three counties in Central Illinois

Delivery Methodology

The program uses hybrid model using both a consultant-auditor and contractors to install the improvements. 

The program provides contractor incentives to offset the training costs of up to 50% once the job has been completed. To date, 24 contractors have received training and 4 to 6 are active in the program.

Program marketing includes a Makeover Contest as a way to educate customers about the benefits of making home energy improvements. The program also relies on the marketing materials developed by EPA, as well as bill inserts and other marketing outreach. Customers also receive low-interest loans from two local banks to help offset the cost of the home improvements.

Measuring Results:  No information provided.

Project Goal: 13 completed in 2006; 125 completed jobs forecasted for 2007.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: No information provided.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies
WECC provides training

Reasons for Success/Failure:  No information provided

Lessons Learned:  No information provided

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.better-built.us

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Ginger Johnson, Phone: 309 637-0934, Email: ginger@triconpeoria.org

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Maine:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:  Efficiency Maine

Mailing Address:  Maine Office of Energy Independence and Security, State House Station #18, Augusta, Maine 04333-0018

Telephone:   631-755-5313

Web site:  www.mainehomeperformance.org

 

History with HPwES

The Maine Home Performance with Energy Star® (MaineHP) Program started as a pilot program but quickly became a state-wide initiative. Funding grew from just $50,000 to more than $1,250,000 in the first year.

Its jump-start is attributed to an innovative customer outreach program that demonstrated the value of home energy improvements though a Home Energy Makeover Contest. This also created interest among contractors, who received training and certification during the contest period.

The program also focuses on providing one-stop-shop access to a whole-house approach to home improvements and emphasizes the following benefits to home owners:

·         reduce energy costs

·         reduce pain of volatile oil markets and homeowner’s high energy bills.

·         reduce energy consumption in the residential sector.

·         address air quality, health and comfort problems especially in light of the wet years/climate shift 

·         stimulate deployment of energy efficient technologies

·         improve public perception of the state government by being an advocate for energy efficiency

·         increase the value of homeowner’s biggest investment and increase the value of Maine’s housing stock which is some of the oldest in the nation.

Year Program Began:  June  2006 

Primary Drivers for Program Implementation

·        Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

·        Address comfort problems

·        Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

·        Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

·        Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

·        Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

·        Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Residential home owners

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor model but also considering a hybrid option.

The program provides contractor incentives of up to $1,700 to defray the costs of training and equipment. Currently, there are approximately 15 qualified contractors in the program.

The program offers loans to low income households, but is also considering offering loans to other home owners as well.

Marketing materials include extensive information on the website to promote energy efficiency improvements. The program also features several other innovative marketing approaches including Energy Savings certificates. The contractors also provide customers with Energy Savings certificates after the project is completed as a way to further reinforce the energy efficiency message.

Other marketing materials include posters, refrigerator magnets, print  media, radio and television advertisements 

There will also be customer case studies posted on the website as more jobs are completed. 

Measuring Results

How do you measure program results? 

·        Energy savings

·        Number of jobs completed

·        Number of contractors trained

·        Value of the home improvements

 

Project Goal:  Forecast to complete 100 jobs in 2007.  Project Goal for the Three year pilot program is 2500 jobs statewide. 

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:  Not Applicable

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

The Governor’s Office of Energy Independence and Security developed the Program in close coordination with the Maine Housing Authority and Efficiency Maine, a division of the Maine Public Utilities Commission.

The program administrator is Performance Systems Development (PSD). 

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

·        Became a part of the political discussion, received high visibility due to support from the Governor

·        Relied on an the Home Energy Makeover Contest to generate leads for contractors and create enthusiasm and awareness among customers.

Lessons Learned

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.mainehomeperformance.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact

Heather Rae, Maine HP Project Manager, phone: 207-319-4482, email: hrae@mainehomeperformance.org
Rick Karg, Senior Technical Consultant, Service Provider Recruitment Coordinator, phone: 207-725-6723, email: rjkarg@karg.com

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Massachusetts:
Partner Information


Company Name: 
National Grid

Mailing Address:   55 Bearfoot Rd, Northborough  MA O1532

Telephone:   508 421-7215

Web site:    www.nationalgridus.com

 

History with HPwES

National Grid, the second largest utility in the US, operates a regional program serving customers in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Current funding is approximately $5 million, but funding could double in the next few years.                               

Year Program Began:     Doing HPwES since 2002

The National Grid programs  have been in existence since the early 1990s or before.  The programs are updated continuously to meet customer needs.  In 2002, the programs were approved as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR.

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

·        Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

·        Address comfort problems

·        Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

·        Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

·        Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

·        Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

·        Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

·        Address customers’ health and safety needs and improve energy savings through a “house as a  system” approach. 

Program Implementation Strategy

National Grid modified its existing energy efficiency programs to conform with the EPA’s program.   In Massachusetts, National Grid is required by law to offer a free home energy audit with follow-up services, that program was modified to include a “house as a system” approach and include incentives to encourage customers to implement energy efficiency measures. Customers can received low-interest loans or direct incentives of 50% of the cost up to $1500.  The program also includes the installation of ENERGY STAR compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) at no cost to the consumer.  The energy savings generated by the CFL installation ensure that offering the free home energy audit is cost effective.  Pre-screening takes place to ensure that the home visit is typically only offered to customers in older homes who need energy efficiency measures installed.   Marketing activities include bill inserts, post cards, direct mail, radio and newspaper ads.

 

Target Markets:  Homeowners

Delivery Methodology:  Contractors and all are BPI accredited

The contractors are responsible for all work done in the home and are subject to quality assurance reviews by National Grid and BPI’s quality assurance staff.

Measuring Results

The program results are measured in the following ways:

  • Energy savings  

  • Number of jobs completed  

Project Goal:  1,456 completed jobs in 2005; 4,852 in 2006; 5,000 is goal for 2007.  

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:

Annually, the  Home Performance with ENERGY STAR programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island typically create over about $16 million in energy savings value, that is, the value of the energy savings based on the energy efficiency measures that are installed.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

CSG, Rise, AES, CET

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

·        Increasing sales of energy efficiency measures

·        Conversion of typical state-mandated programs into real energy savings and home improvements for customers

·        Large numbers of customers served and energy efficiency measures installed.

·        Program does not subsidize non-energy savings measures

·        Quality Assurance is strongly built into the program design.

Program Failure

         Does not have as strong market transformation aspects as some HPwES programs in other areas since it works with general contractor energy service companies as opposed to contractors directly. The program is also experimenting with moving in this direction in Rhode Island.

Lessons Learned

·        Focusing on customer needs and perspective has been very important in improving the programs.   

·        It has been very helpful to learn about HPwES efforts around the country as we consider program design changes.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.nationalgridus.com/shortcut_energyefficiency.asp 

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Laura McNaughton, 508 421-7215,  laura.mcnaughton@us.ngrid.com

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Minnesota:

Partner Information

Company Name:  Xcel Energy - MN          

Mailing Address:   414 Nicollet Mall, 6th Floor, Minneapolis, MN, 55401         

Telephone:   307 742-0313

Web site:  www.xcelenergy.com

 

History with HPwES

Xcel Energy is a combination electricity and natural gas energy company serving 3.3 million electricity customers and 1.8 million natural gas customers. It has regulated operations revenue of more than $9 billion annually and serves customers in Colorado, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin.

Currently Xcel is piloting its Home Performance Rebate Pilot  program in Minnesota. If the program is viewed as cost-effective, it will then be expanded to other state within Xcel’s service territory, The pilot program closed July 1, 2007.  

Year Program Began:    July 2006

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation: No information provided

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Residential home owners in Minnesota.

Delivery Methodology:  Consultant

There were approximately 30 contractors participating in this program. However, these contractors were selected by Xcel but were not required to complete any certification training. All post-test inspections to be conducted by an auditor,

The pilot program was marketed through a mailing in the Fall of 2006. It offered rebates to customers who installed qualifying equipment. The average rebate per home is more than $600.

Customers called Xcel to receive an energy audit for $35, which was charged to their electric bills. The two-hour audit was required in order to participate. The auditor also collected and compared historical usage information for each customer.  After completion of the audit, the customer received a list of certified contractors to perform the work. In order to qualify for rebates, the customer had to agree to implement at least five improvements; three mandatory and two optional If the improvements are made and verified by the auditor within six months, the customer then received a rebate.

Required items included air sealing, attic insulation, and installing 20 CFL bulbs or fixtures. The rebates for these items totaled $290.

Optional items included replacing HVAC equipment, appliances, water heaters or a thermostat set back and the rebates ranged from $10 to $330, depending upon the measures selected.

Measuring Results:  No information provided.

Project Goal:  No information provided.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: No information provided.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

Conservation Services Group (CSG)

Reasons for Success/Failure:  Not relevant

Lessons Learned Not relevant

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.ecelenergy.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Kim Sherman, Phone: 612 337-2360, email:
kim.Sherman@xcelenergy.com
Crystal Manik,
email: (crystal.manik@xcelenergy.com)

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Missouri:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:   Missouri Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

Mailing Address:   Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources–Energy Center, P.O. Box 176, Jefferson City, MO 65102 

Telephone:           800-361-4827

Web site:              www.dnr.mo.gov/energy/energystar.htm  (Later will be www.mohomeperformance.com)

 

History with HPwES

The Energy Center has been involved with HPwES since 2003 and in 2006 began a relaunch of the program through a DOE Special Projects grant.  Implementation is occurring in 3 major markets in the Tri-State areas of Missouri, Illinois, and Kansas (these are in addition to the Peoria, IL, area managed by TRICON – see separate entry within this document).  The three areas include (1) Metro St. Louis (IL & MO), Columbia, MO; (2) Columbia, MO; (3) Kansas City Metro (MO & KS).

Year Program began:  2003 with relaunch in 2006

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

  • Core to Energy Center mission is promoting energy efficiency

  • Create a market for home performance that eventually will not need incentives

  • Increase local awareness of existing home energy & comfort opportunities

  • Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions

  • Reduce need for energy in MO which is primarily imported

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  The three areas include (1) Metro St. Louis (IL & MO), Columbia, MO; (2) Columbia, MO; (3) Kansas City Metro (MO & KS).

Delivery Methodology: The program uses hybrid model using both a consultant-auditor and contractors to install the improvements. 

Missouri is the sponsor for the program and has three local implementing partners: (1) Missouri Botanical Garden’s EarthWays Center in St. Louis; (2) Columbia Water and Light; (3) Metropolitan Energy Center in Kansas City.  Each of these local implementing organizations has provided an implementation plan to the Sponsor, Missouri Energy Center, that outlines their approach to implementation.  Each has the opportunity to offer local incentives to customers or to contractors/consultants as they see fit.  Missouri is leading the marketing effort in a team approach with the local implementing partners and has funded the three partners through subgrants.  Local utilities are also providing funding.

Program marketing began by hiring a marketing consultant that has drafted a marketing plan for the next year and utilizing the EPA ENERGY STAR creative materials.  We are working with utilities for billing inserts and newsletters and intend to also use e-marketing and public radio as well as other public relations approaches such as press releases and announcements at events.  We have designed and will deploy a new Web Site: missourihomeperformance.com soon.

Measuring Results:  There are currently no numbers to report.

Project Goal:  Minimum goals throughout all markets combined based on DOE grant scope: 

·        1100 referrals

·        550 comprehensive home assessments

·        138 improved homes with 2+ items improved

·        Minimum 15% QA 

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: Unknown

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

·        EarthWays Center, State of Illinois-DCEO, Ameren

·        Columbia Water and Light, Boone Electric

·        Metropolitan Energy Center, State of Kansas-KCC, KCPL, HUEE

Reasons for Success/Failure:  Early failure due to lack of funding.  The  re-launch is possible due to new funding and new utility interest in energy efficiency.

Lessons Learned:  N/A

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: Contact Primary Staff

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact

·        Missouri Energy Center: Pat Justis, Phone: 314-416-2960, Email: pat.justis@dnr.mo.gov

#         EarthWays Center: Glenda Abney, Phone: 314-577-0288, Email: glenda.abney@mobot.org

#         Columbia Water and Light: Terry Freeman, Phone: 573-874-7631, Email: twfreema@gocolumbiamo.com

#         Metropolitan Energy Center: Dustin Jensen, Phone: 816-531-SAVE, Email: dustin@kcenergy.org

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Company Name:  Gateway Center for Resource Efficiency    

Mailing Address:  3617 Grandel Square, St. Louis, MO 63108 

Telephone:  314 577-0288

Web site: www.earthwayscenter.org

 

History with HPwES

The Gateway Center for Resource Efficiency is dedicated to promote energy efficiency and sustainability to Missouri home owners. Located on the grounds of the Missouri Botanical Garden, the center provides tours of its green home, and educational activities for both home owners and school children.

It developed a HPwES program several years ago, but this is currently on hold.  It is anticipated that this program will be redesigned to become a state-wide program managed by the State of Missouri. The Earth Ways Center will then become a resource for contractor training and education.

Currently, there are a few trained contractors in the area, but it is not currently active. 

Year Program Began:    Not Applicable; program is being re-launched

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  Not provided

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  to be determined

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

Measuring Results:  Not Applicable

Project Goal:  

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: Not Applicable

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

The redesigned program will be developed in conjunction with the Missouri Energy Office and several utilities. Currently Columbia Utility has agreed to sponsor the program at some level.

Reasons for Success/Failure:  Not Applicable

Lessons Learned:  Not Applicable

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.earthwayscenter.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Glenda Abney, Phone: 314 577-0288, glenda.abney@mobot.org

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Partner Information

 

Company Name:  Metropolitan Energy Center (Kansas City)

Mailing Address:  3808 Paseo, Kansas City, MO 64109

Telephone:   631-755-5313

Web site:  www.kcenergy.org

 

Kansas City Home Performance Network

History with HPwES

The Metropolitan Energy Center manages the Kansas City Home Performance Network, which is a program in Kansas City designed to help homeowners make the improvements that will really work to make their existing homes (whether old or new) more comfortable with lower energy bills. The center provides listings of trained home energy professionals and contractors, certified by the Building Performance Institute (BPI).

Year Program began  March 2003

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

  • Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

  • Address comfort problems

  • Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

  • Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

  • Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Home owners for both new and existing homes

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

Five contractors are listed on the website.  The center subcontracts its training to the Wisconsin Energy Efficiency Corporation (WECC).

 

KC Metro Energy Center is submitting plan to state of Missouri  to participate as a provider of services: recruitment, training and intake/referral.

Measuring Results

·         Energy savings

·         Number of jobs completed

·         Number of contractors trained

·         Value of the home improvements

 

Project Goal:  Not Available

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: Not available

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

KBSI, Heartland Utilities & MO Energy Office

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

·         5 of 6 contractors are still in the program.

·         There is now a go to place for KC homeowners to find Home Performance services.

Program Failure

·         Not enough cash resources to run program as intended or to support contractors.

·         Marketing is weak.

Lessons Learned

·         Make sure resources are matched to program expectations.

·         Build in incentives for contractors

Best Way to Learn of New Development:  www.kcenergy.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Bob Housh, Phone: 816 531-7283, Email: housh@kcenergy.org

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New Jersey:

Partner Information


Company Name:
New Jersey Bureau of Public Utilities, Office of Clean Energy

Mailing Address:  2 Gateway Center, Newark, NJ  07102

Telephone:  973-648-2891

Web site:  www.njcleanenergy.com, www.njenergystar.com

History with HPwES

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® is a market transformation program that helps residential contractors offer comprehensive energy improvement packages based on sound building science principles that produce measurable energy savings to improve the energy efficiency, comfort, safety and durability of customers’ homes. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR is offered to New Jersey residents by New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, Office of Clean Energy and New Jersey’s Clean Energy ProgramTM.

This program provides information and financial incentives to help New Jersey homeowners reduce their energy use by up to 30 percent, thereby lowering utility costs and helping to protect the environment. Specially trained contractors accredited by the Building Performance Institute (BPI) use a comprehensive, whole house approach to test and improve a home’s energy efficiency in order to deliver services that dramatically impact energy savings, comfort, and environmental protection.

Year Program Began:  Pilot program 2005-2006, statewide program began 2007

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

·         Improve energy efficiency to reduce energy usage,

·         Lower utility costs

·         Provide climate change solutions to help protect the environment.

Program Implementation Strategy

The main goal is to position New Jersey at the forefront of the movement to reduce energy consumption by providing tangible home energy solutions that improve comfort, lower energy costs, and increase health and safety.  

This goal will be accomplished in a two-pronged fashion by encouraging:

1.  Remodeling, HVAC and insulation contractors to adopt a whole-house, systems approach to treating homes by becoming certified and accredited by the Building Performance Institute (BPI).

2.  Consumers to look for and request “whole house” energy efficiency solutions as offered by certified BPI contractors participating in Home Performance with ENERGY STAR.

HVAC, insulation and remodeling contractors

The first prong of the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program is to secure the participation of leading contractors throughout New Jersey to deliver performance-based improvements and repairs to energy-related systems in residential homes. 

Strategies

One of the lynchpins of success is to reach contractors with the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR message and to demonstrate how BPI participation can help differentiate and expand their business. This is critical in order to build a strong network of approved contractors who are able to meet consumer demand with work that achieves the highest quality standards.  Financial incentives, training and marketing are provided to establish contractor infrastructure.  

Consumers

The second prong of the proposed Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program is to communicate directly with consumers in order to gain their awareness and adoption of energy saving home improvements. The goal is to promote the comprehensive installation of significant insulation/air sealing and/or HVAC equipment. 

Strategies

A critical component of the program is to reach consumers and educate them about the benefits of Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, making Home Performance synonymous with smart energy savings and encourage consumers to look and ask for BPI Accredited contractors for their home repairs and renovations.

New Jersey’s marketing strategy for Home Performance with ENERGY STAR incorporates an integrated educational advertising, public relations, communications and online campaign to create awareness of whole house services to homeowners and contractors, while promoting Home Performance with ENERGY STAR as one of the New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program premiere solutions to help consumers reduce energy use and climate change, as well as enjoy a more comfortable, healthy and safe home.

In 2007, New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program promoted the program by building upon a strategy to provide “whole house, whole building, whole community” solutions to transform New Jersey’s energy market and support Governor Corzine’s plan to reduce New Jersey’s overall energy use 20% by 2020.

The program offers varying levels of financial incentives to customers who install qualifying improvements:

·         Financing as low as 3.99% up to $20,000

·         50% subsidy for Income Qualified Participants, up to $5,000

·         Up to 50% cash back depending upon comprehensiveness of jobs.

·         The program also offers incentives to contractors who become BPI Accredited:

#         Contractors receive a 50% subsidy to purchase the required diagnostic equipment and 75% subsidy to attend the training, which is fully reimbursed once they are BPI Accredited. 

#         What sets these contractors apart from the rest is the nationally recognized training, certification and accreditation they receive from the Building Performance Institute (BPI).

#         To date, 34 contractors have been BPI Accredited.

 

Target Markets:  Residential home owners of 1-4 family units

Delivery Methodology:  

Participating Contractor and in a coordinated effort to support participating contractors, the program markets directly to consumers, encouraging them to undertake significant energy efficiency home improvements and connects consumers with these specially trained and accredited Home Performance contractors.

Measuring Results

  1. Average Cost of home improvement packages:  $7.390.00 (all completions to date)

  2. Average estimated savings:  $869.00/annually (all completions to date)

Project Goal:   20 completed projects in 2007; 1000 expected completions in 2008

Contractors:  34 BPI Accredited companies

Home Assessments to date:  244 home assessments

Completed Jobs to date:  26 projects completed (including 2007 completions)

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

  • Honeywell/Conservation Services Group serves as implementation contractor.

  • BPI provides technician certification and contractor accreditation.

  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success:

Building upon New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program strategy to provide “whole house, whole building, whole community” solutions, Home Performance with ENERGY STAR is being positioned as a major force in transforming the energy marketplace in New Jersey to use more energy-efficient technologies and renewable energy alternatives as climate change solutions. The program is an integral part of Governor Corzine’s plan to reduce New Jersey’s overall energy use 20% by 2020.

Lessons Learned

·         Provide business development, sales and marketing training for contractors

·         Increase consumer education and awareness to provide greater market “lift off”

·         Develop community networks to increase word-of-mouth advertising and referrals

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.njcleanenergy.com or 1-866-NJSMART

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact

Michael Winka, Director of NJ BPU, Office of Clean Energy, 609-777-3335, michael.winka@bpu.state.nj.us
Mona Mosser, Chief of the Bureau of Energy Efficiency, NJ BPU, 973-648-2891,
mona.mosser@bpu.state.nj.us
Julie DeSeve, Program Manager, Honeywell Market Manager, Conservation Services Group, 732-218-3402,
julie.deseve@csgrp.com

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New York:

Partner Information


Company Name: 
Long Island Power Authority

Mailing Address:  131 S. Hoffman Lane, Islandia, NY11749

Telephone:   631-755-5313

Web site:  www.lipower.org

 

History with HPwES

 

In May of 1998, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) became Long Island’s primary electric service provider. Operating as a non-profit entity, LIPA has continued to serve the Island’s growing population with a consistent commitment to cost-containment, efficiency, and service reliability.

In 2004, LIPA and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority launched the ENERGY STAR® Labeled Homes Program on Long Island, which works with participating builders to increase the energy efficiency, safety and quality of homes. The program has allowed thousands of homeowners throughout New York to lower their energy bills, while protecting the environment. To further help Long Islanders save money, LIPA also offers the Cool Homes Program which offers rebates to homeowners who install properly sized, high-efficiency central air conditioning systems in their homes which are verified to be installed properly.

This program is funded as part of the Clean Energy Initiative and the funding level is projected to grow. Currently, funding is more than $3.6 million.

The current program relies on CSG to provide program administration and quality control.  In September 2007, CSG took a more proactive selling role by participating in a Pilot Sales Program as a way to increase the level of completed projects.

Year Program Began:  July 2006

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  LIPA developed this program as a way to achieve the following objectives:

·         Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

·         Address comfort problems

·         Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

·         Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

·         Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

·         Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

·         Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Residential home owners and customers with solar photovoltaic (PV) systems.

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

CSG reviews 15% of the completed jobs and also helps facilitate BPI accreditation for contractors. Contractors receive incentives of up to 90 percent funding for training and pays for 50% of the equipment costs.

They currently have 20 active contractors.

For customers, LIPA offers 10% cash back or low-interest financing as a way to encourage customers to make home energy improvements. The utility also stresses energy efficiency education both through marketing materials and through a variety of tools on its Web site. Their marketing includes bill inserts and direct mail to targeted customer groups.

Measuring Results

LIPA tracks the following program benchmarks:

·         Energy savings 

·         Number of jobs completed 

·         Number of contractors trained 

 

Project Goal:  43 jobs were completed in 2007; anticipate completing 500 in 2007.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: Program results insufficient to determine

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

CSG is the program administrator.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success:  Recruited top performers in the home efficiency business to be trained as HPwES contractors.

Lessons Learned:  Recruiting large contractor is Key.  Contractors who are not willing to change business model will not be successful.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.lipower.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Juliana Griffiths, 631 755-5359; 
jgriffiths@service.lipower.org

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Partner Information

 

Company Name:  New York State Energy Research and Development Authority,
                            
Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program

Mailing Address:  17 Columbia Circle, Albany, NY 12203-6399 

Web site: www.getenergysmart.org

 

History with HPwES

New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) developed the first Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program. Given its state focus and mandate to serve all regions funded through its System Benefits Charge (SBC), NYSERDA became the single point of contact.

NYSERDA allocated an annual budget of approximately $5 million for implementation, training and quality assurance to support this program. The program’s mission is to transform New York’s trade contractor infrastructure by facilitating training and requiring mandatory contractor certification and accreditation by the Building Performance Institute (BPI).

Year Program Began:    March 2001

The program was launched in six markets beginning in March 2001: Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Binghamton, and the Hudson Valley. NYSERDA provided LIPA program support to expand the HPwES program into Long Island. The program launch was executed after completing focus groups with contractors from the targeted regions, as a way to better understand these regional differences, and also to identify the appropriate messages and themes. Due to the programs early success, this same approach is being replicated as program expands into Westchester County and New York City.

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

·         Create an infrastructure of properly trained and skilled Home Perfomance Contractors

·         Identify and repair health and safety problems in homes  

·         Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

·         Address comfort problems

·         Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

·         Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

·         Create jobs that remain in, stimulate and support the local economy

·         Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

·         Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  The HPwES program targets existing one-to-four family homes within New York Energy $mart Programsm territory. However, the major target audience for this program is the home improvement and HVAC contractors.

The program staff would try to identify a local contractor who could “champion” this program in each regional area. These local champions may be the largest contractor serving the home improvement market, or an aggressive smaller contractor hungry to develop a successful business and set themselves apart and above.

The HPwES program also had to adapt to the unique market characteristics in each regional area to attract local home improvement and HVAC contractors. Therefore, NYSERDA staff would try to identify those resources used by local trades. For example, the adult training community, including community colleges and vocational centers, is where contractors would seek training for their trade. So NYSERDA developed materials and resources that would support building science education and develop the critical skills necessary for contractors to achieve BPI certification. NYSERDA provided this training to contractors in the targeted markets.

NYSERDA developed its marketing plan after establishing a solid understanding that the traditional drivers in the home improvement market are function and appearance for reasons of comfort, aesthetics, and increased home value. NYSERDA learned that most home owners consider home improvements as an added one-time cost paid for through savings or financing, and rarely consider the opportunity to make one-time improvements that are energy efficiency related that might reduce their monthly home operating costs. Further, they learned that most home improvement and HVAC contractors tend to focus along product lines and are not informed of the importance to take a comprehensive “whole house” approach.

The focus groups also identified the critical messages that NYSERDA incorporated in its marketing campaign:

  1. Health/Safety/Comfort

  2. Environmental Benefits

  3. Energy Savings.

NYSERDA maintains an active website designed to promote its variety of energy programs to residential customers. This website (www.getenergysmart.org) focuses on providing information for residential customers.

For the HPwES program, the information provided includes:

·         Education about the importance of making home repairs

·         Case studies documenting energy savings and non-energy benefits

·         Participation guidelines and requirements

·         Loan information and forms

·         Referrals to BPI-qualified contractors 

Delivery Methodology:   Contractor

Participating contractors are required to be BPI Accredited and to have relevant BPI certifications in disciplines such as Building Analyst, Envelope Professional, Heating Professional, and Cooling Professional. Although training is not required for BPI certification, it is strongly suggested for participation in the program. 

Rather than focusing on the traditional rebate structure, NYSERDA focused on building sustainable and lasting changes in contractor behavior and to create market transformation by supporting the infrastrucutre. The program focused on providing incentives to the contractors for training, certification and equipment, and to customers through subsidized loans for energy improvements. The contractor incentives included subsidies for up to 75 percent of the cost of training and certification, partially forgivable equipment purchase loans, and a 5% total job cost incentive.

For consumers, NYSERDA arranged for and bought down the interest rate on financing to help pay for comprehensive jobs. Consumer incentives include unsecured Home Improvement loans (through Energy Finance Solutions) at a subsidized rate, and an unsecured New York Energy $martSM Loan (at the participating lenders option).

The program focuses on sales and marketing training to its participating contractors. NYSERDA sales training focuses specifically on how to sell home performance in a competitive market.

The program’s promotional methods had changed from an event orientation to a heavier emphasis on local TV spots. Some of the more savvy home improvement contractors leverage NYSERDA’s advertising activities by piggybacking onto the television spots. For example, these contractors will “book end,” that is, buy the spots immediately before and after the NYSERDA TV ads.

Some contractors also do targeted telemarketing in the neighborhoods where they are already performing home assessments and making home improvements. These contractors have learned how to successfully leverage a state-wide program and translate that into local lead generation.

Measuring Results

·         NYSERDA has reported the results from its HPwES to date:

·         Number and Size of Jobs: Over 16,000 jobs have been completed at an average job cost to date of over $7,300 per job. Customers have invested more than $119 million of their own money in home energy improvements. Of these NYSERDA has subsidized over 3,500 income-eligible households for installation of eligible measures under the New York Assisted HPwES Program.

·         Average Electricity and Gas Savings: Estimates of the per home average annual savings are as high as 800 kWh and 33 MMBtus (gas or oil) over the life of the program, with trends over the past two years showing higher average savings. 

·         Program is Cost-Effective: The benefit-cost ratio is greater than one, based on energy-savings alone. When non-energy benefits are added, the ratio is as high as 5.

·         Contractor Participation: More than 400 technicians have been BPI certified and more than 140 contracting firms have been accredited by BPI.

·         To date, this program has achieved a total of 1.3 MW of savings and 2 Megawatts of demand reductions.

Project Goal: 55,000 homes by 2011

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: $119 million

As Figure 1 illustrates, savings for home owners participating in the HPwES program have seen a steady increase in the savings achieved. The loan buy-downs have proven to be an effective way to encourage home owners to invest in cost-effective improvements using their own funds, rather than relying on traditional rebate programs, which cover nearly the entire incremental premium associated with these energy efficiency improvements.

 Figure 1. Comparison of System Benefit Charges vs Customer Savings

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

To date, NYSERDA’s program has more than 400 BPI-certified technicians and 143 BPI- accredited firms throughout New York State.

The program staff also identified trade associations and training associations as a way to identify and cultivate these home improvement contractors.

Performance Systems Development is the developer of TREAT, the modeling software used in the program. Other contractors that implement, provide third party quality assurance and training for the program include Conservation Services Group, (CSG), Honeywell, and Hudson Valley Community College and it’s network of learning centers across NYS.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

 

This program is focused on developing a strong network of third-party contractors to provide comprehensive home assessments including energy efficiency testing and then to install the recommended measures.

ts affiliation with ENERGY STAR creates immediate awareness and provides additional credibility to both contractors and customers.

 

Program Challenges

 

The programs’ focus on developing a strong network of third-party contractors to provide comprehensive home assessments and then to install the recommended measures sometimes required cross-participation between trades.

In an effort to provide multiple incentives and opportunities to consumers, program policies and procedures became confusing and hard to implement. A restructuring of offerings mitigated the problem.

In the early stages of the program contractor training was not standardized leaving content to the discretion of the trainer. NYSERDA contracted with Onondaga-Cortland-Madison Board of Cooperative Educational Services to develop standardized training for all BPI disciplines.

 

Lessons Learned

The most important lesson that NYSERDA learned for creating demand was that “Marketing works – it grabs people’s attention, so the staff must be prepared to develop the infrastructure to support this type of state-wide activity.

  1. Start at a level where you can provide market-by-market focus. Rather than diluting funds across the entire state, NYSERDA launched this program successively in discrete markets. This allowed them to quickly reach a critical mass of contractors, and to strategically create awareness and demand

  2. Significant spending on marketing and advertising can stimulate demand for whole-house services. A robust marketing campaign was crucial to the success of their program. The program demonstrated that they could stimulate demand beyond what contractors could provide, and had to strike a balance between consumer demand and contractor infrastructure. Their marketing campaign also demonstrated the serious program commitment, which helps recruit contractors.

  3. Quality Assurance, Quality Control. Quality assurance systems are important in delivering results to homeowners and to build consumer confidence. It will be necessary to provide a strong, market-based QA system for consumer protection, such as a strong BPI accreditation program and a strong M&V component, to continue to deliver the program message of quality and results.

  4. There is a market for home performance contracting. Consumers are willing to pay for a comprehensive whole-house approach to improving the performance of their homes. Contractors use building science to differentiate themselves based on added value, high quality, and solutions that deliver results. This increases homeowners’ trust and confidence in contractors, and leads to comprehensive job scopes.

  5. Consumer marketing needs to address non-energy benefits. Although the primary program goals focus on energy savings, many consumers are more interested in—and willing to pay for—comfort, health and safety, building durability, and indoor air quality.

  6. Home performance contracting is a sustainable business opportunity for contractors. Contractors report that using home performance can lead to higher closing rates, expanded jobs, and higher margins, all of which increase profitability.

  7. Contractors need to “own” this innovation. Third party program support and marketing helps. However, to be successful, contractors must make this their business—not just mount a half-hearted attempt to pick up some government- or utility-subsidized work.

  8. There is a variety of successful business models. From pure consultants to one-stop shop contractors, with many variations in between, different business models can succeed. The most important aspect is a consistent message in the marketplace. Programs should recognize this in their design.

  9. Financing is important. With larger, more comprehensive job scopes, financing is necessary to ensure that a maximum number of homeowners can easily get the work done. Lower interest rates help, but more important are ease of access. Qualification should be simple, quick, and as hassle-free as possible.

  10. Program support can speed adoption. Home performance contracting is happening—it is just a matter of how long it will take to be common practice. It is clear that funding programs can help to greatly accelerate this process by providing quality training and mentoring; serving as a trusted third party messenger to increase market awareness; helping secure preferred financing; and helping provide quality assurance. Conversely, increased interest and investment by the private sector that is already being observed should help speed future program deployment, and improve and reevaluate TRC and other benefit/cost tests for comprehensive programs such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® to include the value of non-energy benefits.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.getenergysmart.org

 

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact 

James Quirk, Sr. Project Manager, Phone: 518-862-1090   ext. 3300, Email: jmq@nyserda.org 

John Jones, Sr. Project Manager, Phone: 518-862-1090   ext. 3365, Email: jcj@nyserda.org

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Ohio:

First Energy - coming soon

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Oregon:

Partner Information


Company Name: 
Energy Trust of Oregon

Mailing Address:   851 SW 6th Avenue, Portland, OR  97204

Web site:  www.energytrust.org

History with HPwES

Energy Trust of Oregon, Inc., began operation in March 2002, charged by the Oregon Public Utility Commission (OPUC) with investing in cost-effective energy conservation, helping to pay the above-market costs of renewable energy resources, and encouraging energy market transformation in Oregon.

Energy Trust funds come from Oregon’s two largest investor-owned utilities. It administers gas conservation programs for residential and commercial customers of NW Natural (starting in 2003) and Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (starting July, 2006), and select programs for residential customers of Avista Corporation (September, 2006) in Oregon.

As part of its responsibility, it developed and sponsors the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR on behalf of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power and NW Natural. The program provides extensive technical training, financial incentives and business development support to participating contractors to help increase opportunities for energy efficiency services for every home they serve. It also offers a variety of financing incentives to home owners.

Year Program Began:  July 2005

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  
No information provided

Target Markets:  Residential customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power and NW Natural Gas

Delivery Methodology: Contractor

Contractors are recruited on the website promoting it as providing these trade allies with a competitive edge and a new business opportunity. It is promoted as a turn-key business development opportunity sponsored by Energy Trust of Oregon that includes sophisticated technical training in the building sciences, purchasing discounts on diagnostic testing equipment, access to low-interest financing and financial incentives for eligible energy efficiency measures for your customers, and cooperative advertising incentives to help reach new customers. The Energy Trust is also developing co-op advertising and marketing opportunities.

Customers receive the following financial incentives:

·         Financial incentives and low-interest financing are available to help pay for the improvements.

#         Up to $20,000 loan limit

#         Up to 10-year term

·         24-hour approval for eligible homeowners

·         Oregon Energy Tax Credits

·         Cash Back  for installing qualifying measures

Measuring Results:   No information provided

Project Goal:  No information provided.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: No information provided.

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

Conservation Services Group (CSG): provides contractor recruitment and training.

EFS Financing for  a wide range of energy efficiency measures.

Building Performance Institute (BPI)  by establishing standards of performance for technicians and providing certifications for qualified contractors.

Reasons for Success/Failure:  No information provided.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.energytrust.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Diane Ferington, 503-493-888, email: diane.ferington@energytrust.org
Dave Hutchins, Home Performance Account Manager, email: david.hutchins@csgrp.com

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Pennsylvania:

West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund (WPPSEF) - coming soon

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Rhode Island: See Massachusetts, National Grid (RI)

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Texas:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:  Austin Energy

Mailing Address:   721 Barton Springs Rd, Austin, TX 78704

Telephone:   512-482-5387

Web site:  www.austinenergy.com

 

History with HPwES

 

Austin Energy is the nation’s 10th largest community-owned electric utility serving  360,000 customers. The utility provides service to several communities including the City of Austin, Travis County and a small portion of Williamson County.

 

The company is also well-known for developing innovative and comprehensive residential and commercial energy efficiency and renewable programs. Its HPwES Program is a city-funded program relying on audits and low-interest loans to encourage customers to make needed improvements. Customers can qualify for up to $1,575.00 in rebates and/or receive additional financing in unsecured loans for installing a list of approved measures including:

·         Installation of a new energy-efficient air conditioner or heat pump (14 SEER or greater) 

·         Additional attic insulation

·         Repair of leaking AC ducts

·         Caulking around plumbing under sinks

·         Weather-stripping around doors

·         Installation of solar shading or awnings

·         Installation of attic radiant barrier reflective material

The utility also offers a bonus of an extra 20 percent rebate for installing both an air conditioner and a heat pump. 

Year Program Began:    May 2005

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

·         Address comfort problems

·         Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

·         Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

·         Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

·         Improve public perception by being an advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy

·         Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  The program is designed for Austin Energy customers with older homes (i.e., 10 years or more) that are either:

·         Single-family home, condominium or town home

·         Duplex

·         Rental property
 

Mobile homes and manufactured homes are not eligible for this loan.

 

The program is marketed extensively through bill stuffers and direct mail. Financing is provided through a local credit union.

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

Until recently, Austin Energy staff has been inspecting 100% of all completed projects, but as the program grows, they are looking at reducing that number. More than 70 certified contractors are working in the community and Austin Energy has developed a robust contractor recognitions program, including an awards banquet. They also provide training and some compensation for contractors’ diagnostic equipment.

Measuring Results

How do you measure program results? 

  • Energy savings

  • Number of jobs completed

  • Number of contractors trained

  • Value of the home improvements

Project Goal:   Austin Energy completed 1,300 in 2005, and is on pace to complete more than 1,700 jobs annually.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:  

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies: Initially the company worked with CSG to provide contractor training. Moving forward, Austin Energy will conduct contractor training.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

They have built up a successful contractor network, and there is even developing interest among solar contractors. They won an EPA ENERGY STAR award in 2006 for their sustained commitment to energy efficiency.

Program Failure:  Wet summer hurt 2007 numbers, so the program may not meet its 2007 goals.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.austinenergy.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Jerrel Gustafason,  512-482-5387; 
jerrel.gustafson@austinenergy.com

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Vermont:

Partner Information

 

Company Name:  Efficiency Vermont

Mailing Address:  255 S. Champlain St., Ste. 7, Burlington, VT 05401-4894    

Telephone:   802 860-4095

Web site:  wwww.efficiencyvermont.com

 

History with HPwES

 

Efficiency Vermont is a statewide provider of energy efficiency services, operated by an independent, non-profit organization under contract to the Vermont Public Service Board.  Efficiency Vermont provides technical assistance and financial incentives to Vermont households and businesses, to help them reduce their energy costs with energy-efficient equipment and lighting and with energy-efficient approaches to construction and renovation.

Efficiency Vermont was created in 2000 by the Vermont legislature and the Vermont Public Service Board to help all Vermonters save energy, reduce energy costs and protect Vermont's environment. 

One way that Efficiency Vermont provides energy efficiency services to Vermont’s residential ratepayers is through the development and promotion of Home Performance with ENERGY STAR.

Year Program Began:    Spring 2005

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

·         Reduce homeowners' high energy bills

·         Address comfort problems

·         Increase local awareness on cost-effective, energy-efficient home improvements

·         Do something beyond traditional rebate programs

·         Stimulate the local economy and create jobs

·         Reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

·         Provide services to residential ratepayers that return benefits in line with their contributions to the Energy Efficiency Charge.

Program Implementation Strategy  

Efficiency Vermont promotes this program to residential customers through its website, and through EPA-funded marketing campaigns in the Spring and Fall of 2007.  These campaigns focused on radio spots, print media ads, and internet keyword search advertising to drive potential customers to the Efficiency Vermont Home Performance web page.  Customers are able to send requests of contact directly to contractors via this web site. To encourage customer interest, they emphasize the following benefits:

·         A home that is healthier, more comfortable and has fewer performance problems

·         Up to 30% savings on energy bills

·         Financial incentives for electrical energy-efficiency improvements

·         Reduced cost financing options to help you pay for qualifying energy-efficiency improvements 

·         Expert home performance contractors

 

Target Markets:  Vermont homes having four units or less.

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

Efficiency Vermont provides contractor training, mentoring, and BPI certification  assistance, along with ongoing quality assurance inspections. It also provides Contractor support and incentives of $100 for each project that is reported to Efficiency Vermont.  Currently, there are 28 certified contractors in Vermont, of which 5 actively report jobs to Efficiency Vermont.

The organization also provides co-op marketing and advertising support to each contractor up to $500 annually.

Efficiency Vermont also partners with four lending institutions to offer discounted loans for qualifying home improvements. Efficiency Vermont reduces the lenders’ market interest rates by 3.5% for loans of up to five years for qualifying Home Performance projects.  This reduced interest rate financing is only available for home improvements completed or supervised by a participating Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® contractor (one who has signed a participation agreement with Efficiency Vermont).

Measuring Results

·         Energy savings

·         Number of jobs completed

·         Number of contractors trained

Project Goal:  Seven completed jobs were reported to Efficiency Vermont in 2005; approximately 50 completed jobs were reported in 2006. Current projections are for 100 reported jobs in 2007.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: $850,000

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies

Efficiency Vermont provides training through VEIC, a BPI affiliate.

Four local lenders provide reduced-interest financing.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success

 

Efficiency Vermont has been reasonably successful at recruiting and training contractors, and, with marketing support of EPA, building awareness of Home Performance services.  There seems to be strong demand for these services in the market.

Program Failure 

Efficiency Vermont continues to be challenged to get contractors to report completed jobs.  Some do, but may not report all jobs, others don’t report jobs at all.  Because our funding source is a systems benefits charge on electric ratepayers, it is also critically important for us to get contractors to address electrical savings opportunities in homes, which has not happened to the desired extent.

Lessons Learned

With limited resources available for this service, identifying the leverage that will motivate contractors to not only participate in training, but to also report completed jobs to Efficiency Vermont is critical.  We do not feel that we have found the answer yet, and we have stepped back from aggressive contractor training efforts to focus on developing solutions to this critical point.

Financing is cumbersome, and while it may address some first cost barriers, it may create barriers in the form of administrative hassles.

It is critical to screen contractors for training sessions, so that they understand Efficiency Vermont’s expectations for participation, and don’t just view the training as good information with no obligation to follow through and get certified and then report jobs.

Many, many people in the energy efficiency community still speak in terms of energy audits, and we have had a number of contractors go through the training with the idea that they will sell audits rather than installations.  We feel that this actually detracts from the development of models where the installation is the focal point.  Having enough qualified installation contractors has consistently been a primary barrier to successful residential energy efficiency retrofits in Vermont.  Adding more auditing capacity does nothing to address that shortfall.

It is challenging to get contractors to really push comprehensive jobs, rather than offer the menu approach where the customer decides which aspects of a job they want to do.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: wwww.efficiencyvermont.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Emily Levin, elevin@veic.org, Bethanny Banghart, bbanghart@veic.org

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Wisconsin:

Partner Information


Company Name:  Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation, Focus on Energy

Mailing Address:   431 Charmany Drive, Madison, WI 53719 

Telephone:   608.249.1271

Web site:  www.focusonenergy.com

 

History with HPwES

Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation is a nonprofit organization based in Madison, WI. Established in 1980, WECC is a national leader in designing and implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy programs that partner with private businesses to deliver value to consumers. It champions innovative energy initiatives that deliver short- and long-term economic and environmental benefits to consumers, businesses, and policymakers. 

Focus on Energy is administered by WECC and works with eligible Wisconsin residents and businesses to install cost effective energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Focus information, resources, and cash-back rewards help to implement projects that otherwise would not get completed, or to complete projects sooner than scheduled. Its efforts help Wisconsin residents and businesses manage rising energy costs, promote in-state economic development, protect our environment and control the state's growing demand for electricity and natural gas.

The primary organizations that make up the Focus on Energy Program include:

  • Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation: Residential, Business, and Renewable Energy Programs

  • Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

  • Statewide Energy Efficiency and Renewable Administration

  • Energy Center of Wisconsin: Environmental Research, Education, and Training Programs

  • PA Consulting Group: Independent Evaluation

  • Hoffman York: Program Marketing

The HPwES program is administered through WECC with funding from the utilities. The funding for the 2007-2008 program year has been increased substantially.

Year Program Began

WECC began operating a whole-house rating program in 1997. This was the beginning of the “Consultant” model. Shortly thereafter this program began offering services in Wisconsin, and the “HouseWorks” program was established. HouseWorks was designed as a whole-house contracting service along the lines of current contractor models. 

In October of 2001, upon passage of Public Benefits legislation creating Focus on Energy, both programs combined into the current Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program, adopting the consultant model while allowing whole-house contractors to operate. 

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation

1.  Address mandates of Public Benefits legislation:

  • Reduce state’s reliance on imported energy

  • Improve reliability of enrgy delivery to state residents

  • Improve air and water quality

  • reate jobs and business opportunities, especially in the rural areas

2.  In recent years the focus has moved towards:

  • Delay or eliminate construction of power plants and transmission lines

  • Reduce greenhouse gases

  • Energy security visavi global politics

3.  For the end-user/customer it has always been:

  • Reduce energy bills

  • Safe, durable operation of their home

  • Comfortable living, year-round

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Renters and owners who live in Focus eligible territories across the state are eligible for cash-back rewards, but any unit can be served by our providers.  Single family units, duplexes, and triplexes are eligible.

Delivery Methodology:  Consultant

This program relies on an independent consultant to conduct all inspections and post-tests after the work has been completed. Focus staff inspects 10 percent of all jobs completed, as an additional way to provide quality control.

The participating qualified contractors receive subsidies to offset the training costs. To date, four have been fully trained and each contractor must complete at least seven jobs annually to stay active in the program.

Customers do receive some cash-back rewards for installing qualified equipment through this program.

The Program is marketed through a variety of channels, including various media, home shows, and via the Web site. The Web site includes information on both energy and non-energy benefits of this program and emphasizes the following key messages:

·         Comfort, with appropriate levels of insulation and air sealing that eliminate drafty rooms and give you more control over indoor air quality and temperature

·         Safety, by identifying and eliminating potentially dangerous carbon monoxide levels due to inadequate venting of your heating system and water heater

·         Durability, by preventing warm, moist air from the inside, as well as rain and external moisture from entering walls and attic spaces and causing structural damage

·         Greater energy efficiency, reducing monthly space heating and cooling costs

·         Resale value, because of the high-performance systems and changes you can implement to improve your home's overall quality

Measuring Results

·         Energy savings (therms, kW, and kWh)

·         Number of jobs completed

·         Number of consultants and qualified contractors trained

·         Percent of completions (pre-inspections vs post installation inspections)

 

Project Goal: 1,145 completed jobs for Program Year 2006-2007 (12 month target); 2,025 completed jobs for Program Year 2007-2008 (18 month target)

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities: Not available

Key Vendors/Partners/Allies:  Energy Finance Solutions (EFS) is a service operated through WECC.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Success

·         Strong consultant and qualified contractor training / mentoring

·         In-house access to financing

·         Strong utility and PSC support

·         Funding from the System Benefits Charge

Challenges

·         Consultant / Trade Ally relationships

·         Not enough staff to promote / educate adequately across the state to consumers

·         Recruiting strong Program Allies

·         Marketing

Lessons Learned

Critical to Program success is:

·         Consultant and Qualified Contractor verification

·         Consultants developing relationships with Program Allies

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.focusonenergy.com: 

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Sue Hanson, Single Family Homes Program Manager, Phone: 608.249.1271 x106, Email: sueh@weccusa.org
Bob Pfeiffer, Project Manager, Phone: 608.249.1271 x168, Email:
bobp@weccusa.org

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Wyoming:

Partner Information


Company Name:  Wyoming Energy Council, Inc.

Mailing Address:   1482 Commerce Drive, Unit D, Laramie, WY 82070           

Telephone:   307 742-0313

Web site:  www.wyoec.org

 

History with HPwES

Wyoming Home Performance with ENERGY STAR  is sponsored locally by Wyoming Energy Council, offers a comprehensive approach to home improvement that provides comfort and both energy and cost savings for Wyoming homeowners.

Wyoming Energy Council, Inc. (WEC) is a non-profit organization incorporated under the laws of the State of Wyoming.  The former Albany County Energy Council, Inc. was incorporated in 1980 and changed its name to Wyoming Energy Council, Inc. in 1996.

Headquartered in Laramie, Wyoming, WEC also has a branch office in Cheyenne, Wyoming and serves all of Albany, Laramie, and Carbon Counties as well as the Eastern Shoshone portion of the Wind River Reservation.

The program received $309,000 for three years from the State. The program receives support from Black Hills Corp. & Cheyene Power and Fuel

Year Program Began:   May 2006

Primary Drivers For Program Implementation:  No information provided.  

Program Implementation Strategy

Target Markets:  Residential home owners.

Delivery Methodology:  Contractor

The contractor must pay for all training, and equipment.  Staff inspects the completed jobs.

The website was redesigned in 2007 to incorporate EPA’s materials. The website promotes the following benefits to home owners:

·         Utility bill savings

#         Homes that have been upgraded with Home Performance with ENERGY STAR reduce their utility bills because they cost significantly less to heat and cool

#         Home energy savings range from 25-30%, but can be as high as 50-60%.

·         Fewer drafts and consistent temperatures across rooms

#         Foaming, caulking and weatherstripping, adding insulation, or replacing windows can help to eliminate uncomfortable cold spots and overheated rooms

#         Many homeowners also report reduced dust in their homes after completing Home Performance with ENERGY STAR projects

·         Better ventilation and humidity control

#         Sealing air leaks and installing right-sized, energy-efficient heating and cooling equipment can dramatically increase the feeling of comfort in your home and can help to control the development of mold

·         Environmental Benefits of Saving Energy

#         Most energy in our homes comes from the burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas) that produce greenhouse gases

#         By saving energy you're helping make the most of our nation’s energy resources and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases

The program will also be advertised through more media buys in the fall. Other outreach efforts include using the home shows, which has proven to be an effective strategy, as well.

Measuring Results:  No information provided.

Project Goal:   5 completed jobs in 2005; 50 completed jobs in 2006.

Estimated Value of Dollar Improvements From These Activities:  No information provided.

Reasons for Success/Failure

Program Success:  WY HPwES has motivated largest state HVAC contractor to take on duct sealing

Program Failure: 

Lessons Learned:  No information provided

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.wyominghomeperformance.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Coordinator, Wyoming Energy Council, (307)742-9924, whpes@wyoec.org

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Industry Ally Profiles

 

Company Name:  Building Performance Institute, Inc.

Mailing Address:  10 Hermes Road, Suite 200, Malta, N.Y.  12020 

Telephone:  877-274-1274; Fax: 866-777-1274

Web site:  www.bpi.org

Company Locations: 10 Hermes Road, Suite 200, Malta, NY  12020           

Description of services offered to support HPwES programs::building

·         Certification of individuals in evaluation, mechanical, envelope and multi-family designations

·         Accreditation of organizations committed to using a quality management system

·         Quality assurance to verify a bpi accredited organizations conformance and provide feedback

·         Affiliation of organizations capable of providing localized delivery of BPI services

·         Consensus developed technical standards based on sound building science 

Program Sponsor References:

NYSERDA (John Jones, 518-862-1090, x 3365)
EPA (Chandler von Schrader, 202-343-9096)

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  BPI national expansion news at www.bpi.org

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact:

Certification & Accreditation:
Mathew Anderson,  Director of certification & accreditation, 877-274-1bpi x105; manderson@bpi.org

Quality Assurance & Affiliate Liasion:
Vikki Murphy, Director of operations, 877-274-1bpi x106; vmurphy@bpi.org

National Development:
Larry Zarker,  Director of National Development, 301-270-4906;  lzarker@bpi.org

National Standards:
Joe Kuonen, Director of National Standards,
518-596-3781; joek@bpi.org 

Administration:
Sally Larmon,
Director of Administration, 877-274-1bpi x103; slarmon@bpi.org

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Ally Information


Company Name:  Conservation Services Group     

Mailing Address:  40 Washington Street, Westborough, MA 01581   

Telephone:  508-836-9500; Fax: 508-836-3181

Web site: www.csgrp.com

Company Locations:  Albany, NY; Cedar Rapids, IA; El Segundo, CA; Eugene, OR; Fall River, MA; Iselin, NJ; New York, NY; Portland, OR; Ronkonkoma, NY; Syracuse, NY; Tampa, FL; Victorville, CA; Westborough, MA

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs:

Utilities and public agencies operating or starting residential retrofit programs turn to CSG for full service program implementation, including program design, marketing, training, field implementation, quality assurance and technical support. Homeowners and home buyers turn to CSG for home performance enhancements as we work with local utilities and energy program administrators to bring expert residential services to the front lines of energy efficiency. In some regions we provide home performance assessments, home energy ratings, and residential program design assistance, and in other regions we train contractors to provide the same services. Directly and through contractor networks, we follow through with the field services homeowners need to improve their homes such as airflow testing, HVAC system efficiency evaluation, insulation and air sealing, air conditioner upgrades and early retirement programs, and lighting retrofits. We help ensure that projects pay off for years to come with lower costs and higher comfort. And we help people take advantage of all available programs, incentives, and rebates offered by utilities and energy program administrators.

Program Sponsor References

Energy Trust of Oregon
Kansas City Power & Light
KeySpan Energy Delivery
Long Island Power Authority
National Grid
New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, Office of Clean Energy

New York State Energy Research and Development (NYSERDA)
NSTAR Electric
NSTAR Gas
Southern California Edison
San Diego Gas & Electric

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.csgrp.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact:
Kathleen DeVito, Director of Corp. Communications, (508) 365-3497
Mary Eddy Stewart, Senior Vice President,
508-365-3277, 617-834-1665, cell, 802-482-2967, VT office

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Ally Information


Company Name: 
Edison Electric Institute

Mailing Address:   701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20004-2696

Telephone:   202-508-5000

Web site:  www.eei.org

The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is the association of U.S. shareholder-owned electric companies. Our members serve 95 percent of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry, and represent approximately 70 percent of the U.S. electric power industry. We also have more than 65 International electric companies as Affiliate members, and more than 170 industry suppliers and related organizations as Associate members.

Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and advocating equitable policies in legislative and regulatory arenas.  In its leadership role, EEI provides advocacy, authoritative analysis, and critical industry data to its members, Congress, government agencies, the financial community and other opinion-leader audiences.  EEI provides forums for member company representatives to discuss issues and strategies to advance the industry and to ensure a competitive position in a changing marketplace.

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Becky Harsh, Manager, Consumer Retail Policy, (202) 508-5563 B, (202) 508-5038 F, bharsh@eei.org
Steve Rosenstock, Manager, Energy Solutions, (202) 508- 5465,
srosenstock@eei.org
 

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Ally Information


Company Name: 
Electric & Gas Industries Association

Mailing Address:   3800 Watt Ave., Sacramento, CA 95821

Telephone:   866-367-3442                    Fax: 800-506-9073

Web site:  www.egia.org

Company Locations:  EGIA is a nationwide non-profit organization with headquarters in Sacramento, California

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

EGIA works with utility companies and state/ local agencies to support of the design, implementation and administration of energy efficiency, home performance and renewable energy programs.  EGIA utility services include; rebate program administration and rebate processing, contractor sales training and utility/ state sponsored energy efficiency and solar financing.  EGIA’s GEOSmart Sustainable Financing Solutions was developed with Home Performance in mind.  With flexible unsecured installment financing, terms up to 20 years and industry low rates, whole house home performance projects become affordable for homeowners and cost effective for the utility.  

Program Sponsor References

Anaheim Public Utilities HPwES

Maine HPwES

Maryland HPwES

Arizona HPwES

Southern California Edison HPwES

Southern California Edison A/C Quality

San Diego Gas & Electric Premium Efficiency

City of Santa Monica (Solar Santa Monica)

TXU Energy Authorized Dealer Network

IID Energy

Roseville Electric

Modesto Irrigation District

Best way to learn of New Developments

For general information regarding EGIA services: www.egia.org

For information regarding EGIA’s energy efficiency and solar financing program: www.egia.org/GEOSmart

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Bruce Matulich, Executive Director, 866-367-3442 x 314; bmatulich@egia.org
Eric Howarth, National Director, Assoc. Development, 209-423-6795;
ehowarth@egia.org

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Ally Information


Company Name: 
Energy Finance Solutions

Mailing Address:   431 Charmany Drive, Madison, WI  53719

Telephone:   (608) 249-9322, ext. 237                        Fax: (608) 249-5788

Web site:  www.energyfinancesolutions.com

Company Locations:   Madison, WI

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

EFS partners with Sponsors to provide and administer financing products for HPwES Programs.  Sponsors may elect to “buy-down” interest rates, enabling contractors to offer an attractive, easy to use financing tool to close sales and help customers to install their desired comprehensive improvements.

Program Sponsor References

Andrew Fisk, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, (518)862-1090, ext. 3351, ajf@nyserda.org

Kevin Harrison, Long Island Power Authority, (631) 436-4230, kharrison@keyspanenergy.com

Diane Ferington, Energy Trust of Oregon, (503) 445-7621, diane@energytrust.org

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.energyfinancesolutions.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Nancy O’Brien, Program Manager – nancyo@weccusa.org
Dan Streit, Program Coordinator – dans@weccusa.org

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Ally Information


Company Name:   GreenHomes America

Mailing Address:   8 Hughes, Irvine, CA 92618

Telephone:   877-867-2833      

Website: www.greenhomesamerica.com

Company Locations: Irvine, CA and Syracuse, NY

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

GreenHomes is the largest industry-accredited, single-source provider of home performance contracting (HPC) in New York. GreenHomes offers an award-winning home improvement service that significantly enhances the comfort, energy efficiency, and air quality of existing single-family homes. GreenHomes performs all comfort and energy efficiency improvements in-house, which include:

·         Comprehensive home assessments

·         Air sealing and insulation

·         Windows and Doors

·         High efficiency air conditioning, furnaces, and boilers

·         Tank and tankless water heating

·         Indoor air quality solutions

·         Solar Thermal

·         Solar Photovoltaics

GreenHomes America has helped more than 10,000 homeowners save money, energy, and be safer and more comfortable in their home.  GreenHomes also helps homeowners reduce carbon emissions to help them do their part to protect the environment and reduce the country’s dependence on foreign oil. GreenHomes is a Building Performance Institute (BPI) accredited organization with industry-leading quality management systems.  GreenHomes has won NYSERDA’s biennial “Outstanding Achievement” award for the fourth consecutive time in February 2008 for its performance in the New York’s Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program.  GreenHomes is beginning its nationwide expansion and will include a franchise offering later in 2008.

Program Sponsor References

NYSERDA (Andrew Fisk)

Anaheim Public Utilities (Phil Hayes)

EPA (David Lee and Chandler von Schrader)

DOE (ed Pollock)

CSG (Stephen Cowell)

Bevilacqua-Knight,Inc. (Bob Knight)

BPI (Larry Zarker)

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:  www.greenhomesamerica.com

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Brett Knox, President,
brett.knox@greenhomesamerica.com
Mike Rogers, Sr. VP, Market Development,
mike.rogers@greenhomesamerica.com

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Ally Information


Hudson Valley Community College
 - coming soon


Ally Information

Company Name:  ICF International

Mailing Address:   9300 Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA 22031

Telephone:   703.934.3000       Fax: 703.934.3740

Web site:  www.icfi.com

Company Locations

United States: Akron, OH; Albany, NY; Baton Rouge, LA; Charleston, SC; Dallas, TX; Dayton, OH; Fairfax, VA; Houston, TX; Lexington, MA; Los Angeles, CA; Middletown, PA; Ogden, UT; Oklahoma City, OK; Orange County, CA; Research Triangle Park, NC; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC 

Abroad: London, England; Toronto, Canada; Moscow, Russian Federation; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; New Delhi, India

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

ICF offers a full range of turnkey program implementation services, including market research; resource planning; measure evaluation and program design; contractor recruitment and infrastructure development; training; program incentive administration; project oversight and quality assurance; program database management and reporting.

Program Sponsor References

First Energy Ohio – program is ramping up for market roll-out in Fall 2007
Maryland Energy Administration – ICF is on SENTECH implementation team

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: Through key staff

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Michael L’Ecuyer, (518) 754-6258, MLEcuyer@icfi.com
Marc Milin, (703) 934-3153,
MMilin@icfi.com
Rick Holmes, (330) 865-3661,
RHolmes@icfi.com

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Ally Information

 

Company Name:  Lockheed Martin Business Process Solutions

Mailing Address:  2277 Research Blvd, Rockville,Md 20874 

Telephone: (contact) 518 429 0121                            

Website: wwww.lockheedmartin.com/bps/

Company Locations:  Multiple national and international offices

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

Lockheed Martin (LM) has over 30 years experience managing and implementing public and utility energy efficiency programs through its legacy company, Aspen Systems.  LM has specialized in delivering energy savings through performance and market intervention strategies. This year , LM  is building a first class capacity and staff to implement and support HPwES nationally through the provision of implementation, training and financing strategies and services.

Program Sponsor References

US EPA, US DOE  and numerous state and utility sponsors recognize the leadership LM is bringing to the HPwES arena.

Best Way to Learn of New Developments:   Contact the primary staff contact listed below

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Rick Gerardi, Senior Manager, Residential Building Performance, 518 429 0121, richard.e.gerardi@lmco.com

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Ally Information
 

Company Name:  Market Development Group

Mailing Address:   P.O. Box 3281, Montrose, CO  81402-3281

Telephone:  970-209-8347         Fax:  702-442-5990

Web site:  www.marketdevelop.com

Company Locations:  Montrose, CO; Frederick, MD; Tigard, OR

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

Market Development Group offers both strategic and tactical consulting to assist program sponsors and partners in designing, implementing, and evaluating Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®. We work with:

·         Stakeholders – program managers, utilities, government officials, community/economic development advocates and other key decision-makers and influencers

·         Channel Partners- trade allies that also serve the residential, commercial and specialized industrial customer markets that program providers are trying to reach and influence. These partners may include HVAC contractors, plumbers, builders/developers, retailers, landlords, community non-profit organizations, etc.

·         Energy End-Users- customers who pay their utility bill directly and make energy-related decisions for themselves as well as those who use energy that is purchased by others (such as renters, college dorm residents, office workers, etc.)

We develop a variety of marketing communications materials to support program planning and implementation including: 

·         Best Practices and Literature Reviews – compendium of relevant and salient points from conference proceeding scans, Internet searches and personal interviews with market leaders to document past program efforts by others and lessons learned.  Examples include: Light Bulb Fundraiser and Home Energy Makeover Contest.

·         Program Implementation Handbooks - step-by-step guide that may include templates customizable marketing materials (i.e. bill inserts, point-of-purchase displays, web pages) as well as internal administration forms designed to facilitate program tracking and evaluation; standards, participation requirements, program “rules,” case study testimonials and “best practices.”  Examples include: Light Bulb Fundraiser.

·         Marketing Communications Campaign Planning and Execution.  Articulate and document the multiple tactical steps and interactions with milestones and timelines for overarching strategic activities aimed at numerous audiences through various channels and mediums. Examples include: Maine Home Performance.

·         Websites and web applications/tools.  Outline site map and create static content as well as dynamic interactions.  Examples include: www.homeenergymakeover.org, www.cflfundraiser.org,  www.marketdevelop.com

·         Printed Materials.  Create point-of-purchase flyers, mailers, brochures and newspaper inserts to promote program as well as internal administrative forms and agreements. Examples include: DMEA Home Energy Guide, Home Energy Makeover and Light Bulb Fundraiser  

·         Broadcast Materials.  Create and produce audio and visual scripts and programs for paid and public service radio, television, point-of-purchase and web media. Examples include Maine “Whole House”  television program at www.mainehomperformance.org and Intermountain Energy geo heat pump commercials at www.intermountainenergy.com.

·         Media Relations.  Identify and outreach to key media “gatekeepers;” draft news releases, media advisories, feature articles and editorials; coordinate distribute with program partners; and publish regionally or nationally through recognized news bureaus.  Examples include: Maine Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program at www.mainehomeperformance.org.

·         Workshops - sessions from ½ day to multi-day with online registrations, handout binders and online proceedings.  Examples include:

#        “Marketing Home Performance with ENERGY STAR” workshop for home improvement contractors and/or program designers

#        “Home Energy Savings” for home owners

#        Intro to DSM and/or Demand Response” for energy services professionals

·         Event Participation -  Plan, negotiate and implement all aspect of your event participation (i.e. community fairs, home shows, industry shows, etc)  to include sponsorship and exhibit benefit negotiation, exhibit display design and building, group registrations, pre- and post-event promotion to attendees, on-site set-up and tear down, organization of customer dinners and other hospitality functions, cross-promotions with trade allies, media relations, etc.  All you do is show up and accept the accolades for your professionally managed participation that maximizes your marketing opportunities.  Examples include: www.hpwes.org and www.cuexchange.org

·         Teleconference/Webinars – Conceptualize, organize and facilitate “distance learning” with low-tech (conference call) and high-tech (Webex) alternatives.  We have the capability to produce your webinar ourselves under your brand name or our own, to include the handling of online registrations with or without credit card payments.  Examples include Western Area Power Administration's  “Intro to Demand Response” at www.wapa.gov/es and various Peak Load Management Alliance topics at www.peakma.com.

Program Sponsor References

David Lee, Dale Hoffmeyer, Chandler Von Schrader and Jon Passe, U.S. EPA

Patricia Plympton, Navigant Consulting (program liaison for U.S. DOE)

Greg Thomas, PSD; (program administrator for Maine Home Performance and PA Home Energy)

Bruce Matulich, EGIA (finance administrator for numerous Home Performance programs)

Best Way to Learn of New Developments: www.markedevelop.com where you can view past issues and subscribe to our email newsletter, Market Developments www.marketdevelop.com/2007newsletter.htm

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Ed Thomas
, Managing Partner, (970) 209-8347, ethomas@marketdevelop.com
Katherine Johnson, Partner, (301) 461-4865,
kjohnson@marketdevelop.com

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Ally Information
 

Company Name:  Performance Systems Development

Mailing Address:   124 Brindley Street, Suite 4, Ithaca, NY 14850

Telephone:   607-277-6240                                        Fax: 607-277-6224

Web site:   psdinfo@psdconsulting.com

Company Locations: Ithaca, New York

Description of Services offered to support HPwES Programs

Performance Systems Development (PSD) partners with local, regional and national organizations to provide consulting, software development and training services that transform the marketplace for energy-efficiency and building performance services.

·         Home Performance program design and implementation

·         TREAT modeling software to calculate savings and carbon reduction

·         Tracking software for aggregating energy savings data and reporting results

·         BPI and HERS technical training that includes building science and HP business development

·         Home energy makeover events to stimulate consumer demand for HP services

·         Legislative change support  

·         Accredited provider for both BPI and RESNET

Program Sponsor References

·         The California Energy Commission

·         The California Public Utilities Commission

·         New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

·         New Hampshire electric utilities (PSNH)

·         US Green Building Council

·         The State of Washington Weatherization Program

·         The State of Maine Office of Energy Independence and Security

·         The New York State Weatherization Directors Association

·         The National Association of Home Builders Research Center

·         The Enterprise Foundation

·         The Western Pennsylvania Power Sustainable Energy Fund

·         Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corp.

·         US Housing and Urban Development

Best way to learn of New Developments: www.psdconsulting.com, www.treatsoftware.com, www.pscontracting.com  

Key Staff Individuals/ Primary Staff Contact
Greg Thomas, President, 607-277-6240 x201; gthomas@psdconsulting.com
Conrad Metcalfe, VP Operations and Training, 607-277-6240 x202;
cmetcalfe@psdconsulting.com

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Technical Report  NREL/TP- 640-41903, July 2007: "Home Performance with ENERGY STAR: Utility Bill Analysis on Homes Participating in Austin Energy’s Program", given by D. Belzer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; G. Mosey, P. Plympton and L. Dagher, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a jointly managed program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This program focuses on improving energy efficiency in existing homes via a whole-house approach to assessing and improving a home’s energy performance, and helping to protect the environment.

ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2006: "Home Performance with Energy Star®:Delivering Savings with a Whole-House Approach", given by Michael Rogers, GreenHomes America; Megan Edmunds, E-Star Colorado; Robert Knight, Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc.

This panel will discuss why and how the home performance contracting approach works, emphasizing program design considerations and results from programs with up to 5 years experience. The results reported in this paper’s case studies provide evidence of growing momentum in home performance contracting, achieving continuing growth and success in long-term energy savings.

Industry Forum, 2007: "Home Performance with ENERGY STAR" Agenda, Doubletree Hotel, Scott Circle, Washington, DC,

  • Identify and summarize barriers to adopting home performance contracting for large, national companies

  • Solicit industry feedback on proposed DOE research to address technical barriers

  • Identify and summarize strategies to overcome barriers

  • Identify what infrastructure is needed for companies to adopt home performance contracting   and potentially partner with Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

ENERGY STAR Training Presentation, 7/26/2007: "WORKING WITH ENERGY STAR: Residential New Construction & Home Retrofits", given by David Lee, Chief, ENERGY STAR Residential Branch, (excerpt from)

·         Over 65% of Americans recognize the ENERGY STAR.

·         Most consumers associate ENERGY STAR most often with appliances, office equipment, and other consumer products.

·         In 2006, Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR

#         prevented the release of greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from 25 million vehicles

#         saved more than $14 billion on energy bills

#         But did you know . . .

ENERGY STAR publication, 7/18/06: "The Consultant and Contractor Models For Home Performance with ENERGY STAR", (excerpt from)

There are two fundamental business models being implemented under Home Performance with ENERGY STAR programs – the “home performance consultant” and “home performance contractor” models. These two models are different in many ways especially with regards to who completes the work. However, these models are not mutually exclusive and hybrid models should be considered by a program sponsor.

ENERGY STAR publication, 7/18/06: "Description of Quality Assurance Procedures", (excerpt from)

"Effective quality assurance procedures are an essential component of a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program. This requirement reassures homeowners and program sponsors that contractors are performing high quality work and delivering value. Quality assurance also protects the message and maintains the credibility of the ENERGY STAR brand.

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR requires quality assurance through either: (1) a rigorous certification and accreditation process; or (2) oversight and inspection by a qualified third party. These two quality assurance options are described below..."

ENERGY STAR publication, 4/11/07: "Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® - A Cost-effective Strategy for Improving Efficiency in Existing Homes"

An introduction to what the program strategy known as ENERGY STAR®  really involves such as Design and Implementation, Measurement and Verification, and Program Cost-Effectiveness.  

NYSERDA Presentation " Implementing Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® in New York State The NYSERDA Model", given by John Jones, (excerpt from)

"More and more homeowners are committed to saving energy and reducing their utility bills.

The NY Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® (HPwES) Program provides low-cost training to contractors so that they can become an Accredited Home Performance with ENERGY STAR contractor.

Participation in the HPwES program helps generate more business, improve quality and service to current customers, and includes the contractor in a select group in the marketplace."

Electric & Gas Industries Association presentation, 9/20/07: "Tools That Drive Successful Home Performance Programs, Helping Contractor’s Sell Home Performance", given by Bruce Matulich, (excerpt from)

"EGIA brings all facets of the home improvement market together towards one common goal... saving energy! 

  • Utility Sponsored Programs: Rebate & Financing Program Administration, Training, Strategic Planning, Industry Advocacy,  3rd Party Validation

  • Manufacturer / Distributor: National Program Development, Joint Marketing,  Sales Training

  • Solar & Renewable Energy: Industry Advocacy, Contractor Training, Market Development, 3rd Party Validation

  • Contractor Direct Programs: Buying Group Financing, Insurance Programs & Other Value Added Services, Sales Training, Approved Contractor Marketing Program

“Guide to Training Programs for Home Performance Professionals", University of Central Florida

Event Proceedings

California Utility Collaboration to Transform Existing Homes with Home Performance with ENERGY STAR, Downey, CA, March 2008

National Symposium, Cleveland, May 2007

Beyond Home Energy Audits with Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Workshop, Long Island, NY, September 2007

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